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Episode Directory

September 2014

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  • 1/30/2013: The Changing Face of Contemporary Egyptology: Old Perspectives and New Directions Listen Now
  • 1/23/2013: Maritime Archaeology in the South Pacific and Southeast Asia Listen Now
  • 1/16/2013: “And They Also Made Boats…” Maritime Archaeology in Pharaonic Egypt” Listen Now
  • 1/9/2013: The Nuts and Bolts of Compliance Archaeology Listen Now
  • 1/2/2013: Indiana Jones Listen Now

December 2012

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December 2011

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October 2011

September 2011

Jeffrey H. Altschul

Jeffrey H. Altschul is the Chairman of the Board of Statistical Research, Inc., a for-profit cultural resource management firm headquarted in Redlands, California. He has a B.A. in Anthropology from Reed College and a PhD in Anthropology from Brandeis University. Dr. Altschul is a nationally recognized expert in the development and use of archaeological predictive modeling and has been the Principal Investigator for more than 700 cultural resource investigations and programs, predominantly in the Southwest and southern California. He has directed numerous projects for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Air Force, Bureau of Land Management, Prima County (Arizona), Navajo Nation, Arizona Department of Transportation and numerous other agencies and private sector firms. Dr. Altschul is currently president of the Register of Professional Archaeologists and sits on the Arizona Governor’s Archaeological Advisory Council. View Guest page

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Kathryn Bard

Kathryn Bard is a Professor of Archaeology at Boston University. She received her B.A from Connecticut College in 1968, M.F.A. from Yale University in 1971, M.A. from University of Michigan and University of Toronto in 1974 and 1976, respectively, and lastly, her Ph.D from University of Toronto in 1987. In the course of her career she has conducted field excavations in Egypt (Predynastic settlements at Hu, Hu-Semaineh and pharaonic port of Mersa/Wadi Gawasis) and Ethiopia (Ona Edna Aboi Zewge and Ona Nagast) for over 20 years. Bard also authored and coauthored numerous books and article, including “An introduction to the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt,” “From Farmers to Pharaohs: Mortuary Evidence for the Rise of Comple Society in Egypt,” and most recent book coauthored with R. Fattovich, R. Pirelli and A. Manzo “Mersa/Wadi Gawasis, A Pharaonic Harbor on the Red Sea.” View Guest page

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Erin Baxter

Erin Baxter is a doctoral student and Graduate Teaching Instructor at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research focus is on the Chacoan and Post Chacoan (AD 900-1200) Southwest with particular interesting in architecture and ceramics. Erin's dissertation is an examination of historic photographs taken by Earl Morris during excavations of Aztec Ruins (a post-Chacoan great house) and using them along historic documents and GIS to reconstruct a biography of Aztec Ruins. Erin was a professional archaeologist for 7 years (at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center) before returning to graduate school (for an early-midlife crisis), and has had the opportunity to work in Tunisia (Roman) Bolivia (Inka), Turkey (Catalhoyuk), Ireland (Viking), and throughout much of the US Southwest... Erin is from Austin TX, and has a BA in History and Anthropology from Trinity University and an M.S. in Museum Studies from CU. View Guest page

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Tim Beach

Tim Beach holds the Cinco Hermanos Chair in Environment and International Affairs and is Professor of Geography and Geoscience at Georgetown University. He has conducted field research in the US Corn Belt, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Syria, Turkey, and Germany funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Geographic Society, USAID, USIA, and Georgetown University. Based on these field studies, he has published many articles and chapters and has made numerous scientific presentations around the world. His research focuses on soil and agricultural systems, environmental change, and geoarchaeology. He also teaches courses in environmental science and physical geography (climatology, hydrology, geomorphology, and environmental management) and how these relate to international management and policy in the STIA and environmental studies programs. View Guest page

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Dr. William Belcher

Dr. William Belcher is currently serving as the Deputy Director for the Central Identification Laboratory of the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command. He received his B.A. and M.A. in anthropology from Western Washington University, M.S. in Quaternary Studies from the University of Maine, and he received his PhD in Anthropology from University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining JPAC, Bill conducted archaeological research in northern New England and the Maritime Provinces, the Pacific Northwest, and Pakistan. In the service of JPAC he has led recovery and investigation operations in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, United Kingdom, the Republic of Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Palau, the United States, and North Korea. He has over 25 years of archaeological field and laboratory experience, and has published over 30 articles and reports in professional archaeological, anthropological, and historical journals and books. View Guest page

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Dr. Miriam Belmaker

Dr. Miriam Belmaker is a Paleolithic archaeologist and paleoanthropologist at the University of Tulsa. Her research focuses on environmental change primarily in the past 2 million years and how it affected hominid biological and cultural evolution. She analyzes fossil faunal remains obtained from archaeological and paleontological sites to reconstruct ancient environments through space and time and to ask questions about human evolution. She is currently building a large comparative collection to assist her in her research. This includes comparative collection of modern species, fossil casts as well as a virtual collection based on 3D images of famous fossils. In addition to lab based research in her lab at TU, she currently has several ongoing collaborations which include excavation in several archaeological sites in Israel, Armenia and South Africa. View Guest page

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Danielle M. Benden

Danielle M. Benden is a Curator of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin in the Department of Anthropology. She received her B.S. in Archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Cross and M.S. in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Ms. Benden has more than 10 years experience conducting archaeological investigations in the Midwest. Her own archaeological research focuses on the archaeology of southwestern Wisconsin. Currently, she is co-directing a 3-year research project that focuses on the presence of Mississippian peoples in the Upper Mississippi River Valley about 1,000 years ago. View Guest page

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Christopher A. Bergman

Christopher A. Bergman is a Principal Archaeologist with URS Corporation in Cincinnati, Ohio. He received his PhD in Prehistoric Archaeology from the University of London in 1985. He has worked extensively in the Middle East, Europe, and Japan, and in the United States has been actively involved in Cultural Resource Management studies related to natural gas and petroleum products pipelines for over 20 years. Dr. Bergman’s research interests include lithic technology, experimental archaeology, and the material culture of people living in marginal resource settings. View Guest page

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Steve Black

Steve Black is an assistant professor of anthropology at Texas State University in San Marcos. He specializes in the prehistoric foraging peoples of greater Texas, archaeological methodology, public education, and Cultural Resource Management. He is founding editor and current co-editor of TexasBeyondHistory.net (TBH), the virtual museum of Texas’ cultural heritage. Although the bulk of Steve’s career has been spent doing university-based CRM research in south-central North America (Texas), he enjoyed a sojourn doing Maya archaeology in Guatemala and Belize and spent eight years building TBH. Black’s ongoing research program, Ancient Southwest Texas, involves archaeological field investigations in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of southwest Texas. View Guest page

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Dr. Michael L. Blakey

Michael Blakey received a B.A. at Howard University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He has held numerous research appointments, both in the U.S. and abroad. He has served as President of the Association of Black Anthropologists, and as founder and curator at the W. Montague Cobb Biological Anthropology Laboratory. Since 2001, Dr. Blakey has held a joint position in the departments of Anthropology and American Studies at the College of William and Mary, where he founded the Institute for Historical Biology. Professor Blakey served as Principal Scientific Director of the New York African Burial Ground Project from 1992 -2004. He is currently a member of the Scholarly Advisory Committee for the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African-American History and Culture on the Mall. Mr. Blakey has consulted on many museum exhibitions including the American Anthropological Association’s “Race: are we so different” and the Visitor Center of the African Burial Ground National Monument in New York City. He has received numerous honors, including, most recently, the 2012 SANA Prize for Distinguished Achievement in the Critical Study of North America. View Guest page

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Kyle Bocinsky

Kyle Bocinsky is a doctoral student at Washington State University and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. His research focuses on computational approaches to understanding cultural evolution, and specifically cultural adaptations to environmental change. Kyle is a part of the Village Ecodynamics Project research team, which is a multi-institutional effort to better understand the famous depopulation of the Four Corners area of the US Southwest during the 13th century. He has participated in field projects in Mesa Verde National Park and elsewhere in southwestern Colorado. Kyle originally hails from Woodstock, Georgia and received his undergraduate degree in anthropology from the University of Notre Dame. View Guest page

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Cory Breternitz

Cory Breternitz has over 45 years of field, analysis and publishing experience. He has participated in some of the largest regional projects including the National Park Service Chaco Canyon Project, New Mexico and the Dolores Project, Colorado. He has worked for academic institutions, museums, the Navajo Tribe, and private consulting firms. For 25 years Cory owned Soil Systems, Inc. a private firm that conducted some of the largest excavations linked to the Hohokam culture in Arizona. View Guest page

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Tobi A. Brimsek

Tobi A. Brimsek is the Executive Director for the Society for American Archaeology and has held this position for the past 17 years. She received her B.A. degree from Goucher College, M.A. degree from University of Michigan, M.S. degree from Catholic University. View Guest page

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Dr. Alex Brown

Dr. Alex Brown is currently employed as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate on the Ecology of Crusading Project (2010-2014), funded by the European Research Council. His research interests centre on the application of palaeoecology as a tool for investigating past human-environment interactions over the course of the Holocene. Alex has over ten years’ experience working in intertidal and wetland landscapes, completing his PhD (2005) on the evidence for human impact on the prehistoric landscapes of the Severn Estuary (UK), linked to the NERC funded Mesolithic to Neolithic Coastal Environmental Change Project. Alex is also co-director (with Martin Bell) of the Peterstone Palaeochannels Project, which has been investigating the traces of Bronze Age activity within the Welsh Severn Estuary. Alex has a particular research interest in the ecology of frontier landscapes and the ecological responses to human agency and cultural change, currently focused on Medieval Europe. Alex is also developing research on the landscape impact of the Mongol invasions of central Europe. View Guest page

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Richard Buckley

Richard Buckley from the University of Leicester is the lead archaeologist on the Greyfriars project. After graduating from the University of Durham in 1979, Richard became a Field Officer with Leicestershire Archaeological Unit from 1980 to 1995. During this time he worked on the investigation of Leicester Castle Hall and John of Gaunt’s Cellar (1986), the Shires excavation (1988-89) and the Causeway Lane excavation (1991). In 1995, he formed (with Patrick Clay), University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) where, as co-director, he manages archaeological fieldwork projects principally in the East Midlands, specializing in urban sites and historic buildings. He was consultant and project manager for the Highcross Leicester Project, which led to three major excavations with a budget of over £4m. View Guest page

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William Caraher

William Caraher is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and a founding member of the Working Group in Digital and New Media at the University of North Dakota. Since 2012 he has applied methods developed during excavations in the Mediterranean to begin to document the life and material culture in the man camps in the Bakken Oil Patch in Western North Dakota. In 2014, his interest in the archaeology of late capitalism extended to his work on the famous Atari Burial Excavation in Alamogordo, New Mexico with a team of punk archaeologists and filmmakers. Perhaps Caraher’s best-known scholarly accomplishment is his blog the “Archaeology of the Mediterranean World,” which is among the most visible and widely read scholarly blogs on archaeological topics on the interwebs. He is also the co-founder of the Punk Archaeology movement with Kostis Kourelis and a peer reviewed volume on the same topic will appear in 2014. In 2006, he produced the award-winning documentary “Survey on Cyprus,” directed by Josiah Patrow, and has quietly begun a new project to develop a digital academic press at the University of North Dakota. View Guest page

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Susan M. Chandler

Susan M. Chandler is President of Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc., a cultural resources management firm in Colorado that she founded in 1987. Ms. Chandler holds an M.A. in Anthropology (Archaeology) from the University of Colorado. She has worked extensively in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and El Salvador. Her publications include articles in American Archaeology, Utah Archaeology 1990, and chapters in numerous edited volumes. Ms. Chandler has authored or co-authored over 100 papers and reports on various aspects of cultural resources. Susan is past president of the Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists and the American Cultural Resources Association (ACRA). She has also served as Treasurer of the Society for American Archaeology. She remains a member of the Utah Professional Archaeological Council, the Wyoming Association of Professional Archaeologists, and the New Mexico Archaeological Council. View Guest page

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Geoff A. Clark

Geoff A. Clark in the course of his remarkable career was a Regent’s Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. He has headed the Archaeology Division of the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropology Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Clark is the author, co-author or editor of over 250 articles, notes, reviews and comments, and 11 monographs and books on human biological and cultural evolution. His current interests turn on the logic of interference underlying knowledge claims in the various aspects of modern human origins research, and with applications of neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory in archaeology. Clark has done fieldwork in Arizona, Mexico, France, Spain, Cyprus, Turkey, and Jordan. He also lectures on race, racism, and ethnic conflicts, as well as the conflict between religion and science, human evolution, and modern human origins. View Guest page

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Eric H. Cline

Dr. Eric H. Cline is Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at The George Washington University. A former Fulbright scholar, Dr. Cline holds degrees in Classical Archaeology (BA, Dartmouth), Near Eastern Archaeology (MA, Yale), and Ancient History (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania). His field experience extends for over 25 years in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, Cyprus, Greece, Crete, and the United States. He is Associate Director (USA) at the site of Megiddo (biblical Armageddon) in Israel. Dr. Cline is a prolific author and three-time winner of the Biblical Archaeology Society’s Award for “Best Popular Book on Archaeology”. He is perhaps best known for The Battles of Armageddon: Megiddo and the Jezreel Valley from the Bronze Age to the Nuclear Age (2000); Jerusalem Besieged: From Ancient Canaan to Modern Israel (2004); From Eden to Exile: Unraveling Mysteries of the Bible (2007); and Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction (2009). View Guest page

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Douglas Comer

Douglas Comer is President of Cultural Site Research and Management (CSRM) and the CSRM Foundation, and Co-President of the International Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM) for ICOMOS. A Fulbright Scholar in cultural resource management, he served for 15 years as Chief of the United States National Park Service Applied Archaeology Center and nine years as Chair of the Maryland Governor’s Advisory Committee on Archaeology. After two terms on the Board of Trustees for the United States Committee for ICOMOS (US/ICOMOS), he now represents the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) on the Board. He is Senior Editor of the Conservation and Preservation Section of the Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology, Senior Editor for the Springer Press/ICAHM publication series Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Archaeological Heritage Management, Fellow at the Whiting School of Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, and Visiting Independent Advisor with the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech (JPL/NASA). He has published extensively on archaeology, aerial and satellite remote sensing, and heritage management. View Guest page

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Zoë Crossland

Zoë Crossland is based in the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University. Her interests lie in semiotic archaeology, and archaeologies of death and the body. She writes on Madagascar, forensics, and historic burial practices in the United Kingdom, with a focus on the archaeology of the last 500 years and of the contemporary world. Crossland examines situations where new beliefs and practices are introduced, and the conflicts and negotiations that are prompted by their introduction. She works through a variety of case studies, including the archaeology of mission, and forensic exhumation to understand the material-semiotic formations through which apparently incompatible attitudes and practices may be negotiated and transformed. View Guest page

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Terence D’Altroy

Terence D’Altroy is the Loubat Professor of American Archaeology in the Department of Anthropology and the founding Director of the Columbia Center for Archaeology at Columbia University. He has conducted research in Missouri, California, Mexico, Peru, and Argentina since 1969. Most recently, he has been supervising research by his students in the Cuzco region and royal plantations in the jungles north of Machu Picchu. His research and publications, including 5 books and monographs and about 50 articles, have dealt primarily with the principles and practice of Inca politics, economics, militarism, and infrastructure. At present, he is completing the second edition of The Incas (Blackwell), a comprehensive overview of the empire, written for a broad audience. View Guest page

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Loren Davis

Loren Davis is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Oregon State University. Dr. Davis received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Alberta in 2001 and joined Oregon State University in 2004. He is the Executive Director of the university’s Keystone Archaeological Research Fund and Director of the Pacific Slope Archaeological Laboratory. Dr. Davis’ current research focus is on initial peopling of the west coast of North America. He has conducted archaeological investigations in the Pacific Northwest and in northwest Mexico’s Baja California peninsula. Loren directs an archaeological research program each summer in western Idaho at the Cooper’s Ferry site, which contains an early record of Western Stemmed Tradition occupations. View Guest page

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Matthew Des Lauriers

Matthew Des Lauriers is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Anthropological Research Institute at California State University, Northridge. He has worked in Baja California since 2000, primarily on the island of Isla Cedros. Dr. Des Lauriers is engaged in co-operative research with scholars from the Insituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia of Mexico, Oregon State University, and the University of California, Irvine. Matthew’s contributions have extended from historic period otter hunters and miners to the earliest colonization of the Baja California Peninsula. His present Proyecto Arqueologico Isla Cedros has dramatically changed intepretations of the indigenous history of Baja California. View Guest page

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Jeremy DeSilva

Jeremy DeSilva is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Boston University. He is a functional morphologist, specializing in the locomotion of early apes (hominoids) and human ancestors (hominins). He has a particular expertise in the foot and ankle and has worked most recently on the amazing ~2 million year-old skeletons of the South African hominin Australopithecus sediba. He has studied fossils in museums throughout East and South Africa. Additionally, he has studied locomotion in wild chimpanzees in Western Uganda, and currently oversees a research project studying the range of variation in modern human walking. Before entering academia, Jeremy worked as an educator at the Boston Museum of Science and continues to be passionate about science education. When he is not studying fossil foot bones, or lecturing on human evolution, Jeremy and his wife, Erin, are quite busy with their 3 year-old twin toddlers, Benjamin and Josephine. View Guest page

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William H. Doelle

William H. Doelle is President and owner of Desert Archaeology, Inc. (founded in 1989) and President and CEO of the nonprofit Center for Desert Archaeology in Tucson, Arizona. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. Bill’s research interests are the large-scale demographic and cultural changes of the American Southwest and Mexican Northwest. He is also involved in preservation programs and in developing public outreach venues. Desert Archaeology has a staff of 37 employees. In 2009, Archaeology Magazine, named Desert Archaeology’s project on prehistoric irrigation farming as a “Top Ten Discovery “of the year. Bill’s nonprofit Center for Desert Archaeology staff has conducted a series of grant-funded projects and its public outreach arm produces the quarterly magazine, Archaeology Southwest, web-based materials, and monthly archaeology café events. Funding is generated from grants, memberships, private donors, and endowments. View Guest page

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John F. Doershuk

John F. Doershuk is a State Archaeologist of Iowa (since 2007) and Adjunct Assistant Professor (since 1995) in the Department of Anthropology at The University of Iowa. Doershuk has 29 years of professional experience in cultural resource management archaeology including involvement as a principal investigator or project archaeologist on more than 1,200 archaeological projects throughout the Midwest. His early field experience was with a large excavation project on the Ohio Hopewell Harness Mound site near Chillicothe, Ohio; in his current role as State Archaeologist of Iowa he is intensively involved with consultation and research involving ancient mounds and cemeteries. John has published or co-published 20 articles in professional journals and co-edited two monographs in addition to being author or co-author of 45 conference papers and 100s of archaeological reports. View Guest page

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Dr. Christopher D. Dore

Dr. Christopher D. Dore, a registered professional archaeologist, has both a doctoral degree in anthropology and master’s degree in business administration. His career experience includes holding executive positions in leading cultural resource and environmental consulting companies. Dr. Dore has served his colleagues and the industry as the President of the American Cultural Resources Association and the Treasurer of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA). He has received a Presidential Award from the SAA and currently is the editor of Advances in Archaeological Practice. While traditionally trained as a Maya archaeologist, Dr. Dore’s research passion is now the business of heritage management. He currently serves as a consulting archaeologist, expert witness, Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, and Treasurer of Archaeology Southwest. View Guest page

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Dr. James Doyle

Dr. James Doyle is a post-doctoral associate in Pre-Columbian Studies at Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, as well as an adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University, in Washington D.C. His expertise lies in the civilizations of the Ancient Americas, particularly the Preclassic Period (ca. 1000 BC – AD 250) in the Maya Lowlands in the Yucatan Peninsula. His interests include emerging politics, monumental art and architecture, urbanism, landscape, performance, and human/environmental interaction, among others. He holds degrees from Vanderbilt University and Brown University, and has conducted extensive fieldwork in northern Guatemala. For more information and publications, please visit http://jamesdoyle.net. View Guest page

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Dr. Charles R. Ewen

Charles R. Ewen received his PhD at the University of Florida in 1987, and since 1994 has been a full professor in the Department of Anthropology at ECU as well as Director of the Phelps Archaeology Laboratory. He recently was elected the president of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Charlie’s research interests focus mostly on historical archaeology (specifically the contact and colonial periods). However, like most archaeologists, circumstances have led him to work on nearly every kind of archaeology site, from prehistoric villages to Civil War fortifications and twentieth-century homesteads. While in NC, Charlie has directed several projects at Tryon Palace Historic Sites & Gardens in New Bern, Ft. Macon State Park, Hope Plantation, Somerset Place, and a long-term archaeological study of Historic Bath, North Carolina. Besides several articles and book chapters, Charlie is the author or editor of five books, including Searching for the Roanoke Colonies, (NC Division of Archives and History) and X Marks the Spot: The Archaeology of Piracy (University Press of Florida). He is currently under contract with University Press of Florida to co-author a book with Tom Shields to be entitled Roanoke Reconsidered: What Happened to the Lost Colony and another book on the archaeology of piracy. View Guest page

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Brian Fagan

Brian Fagan is an archaeologist, historian and a writer. He received his B.A, M.A. and Ph. D. at Pembroke College, Cambridge in archaeology and anthropology. From 1959 through 1965 he was Keeper of Prehistory at the Livingstone Museum, Zambia, where he was involved in fieldwork on multidisciplinary African history and in monuments conservation. In 1966 he moved to the United States and became Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He specializes in communicating archaeology to the general audiences through lecturing, writing, and other media. His many books include three volumes for the National Geographic Society, including the bestselling “Adventure of Archaeology”. Other works include “The Rape of the Nile,” “The Great Warming: Climate Change and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations,” “Cro-Magnon: How the Ice Age Gave Birth to the First Modern Humans,” and many others. View Guest page

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Michael Faught

Dr. Michael Faught is a senior Maritime Archaeologist at Panamerican Consultants, Inc, assistant professor at the Department of Anthropology at University of Florida and Treasurer and Board Member at Archaeological Research Cooperative. He received his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology at University of Arizona in 1978, 1989 and 1996, respectively. His research interests include Paleoindian and Early Archaic cultures, their origins, pathways, settlement patterns, and emergence of regional traditions. Dr. Faught extensively uses predictive modeling, remote sensing, underwater excavation and geoarchaeological sampling methods for submerged prehistoric sites in his research. He also has experience conducting archaeology with avocationals, high schoolers, and people with physical and mental disabilities. View Guest page

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Kenneth L. "Kenny" Feder

Kenneth L. "Kenny" Feder (born August 1, 1952) is a professor of archaeology at Central Connecticut State University[1] and the author of several books on archaeology[2] and criticism of pseudoarchaeology such as Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries: Science and Pseudoscience in Archaeology.[3] His book Encyclopedia of Dubious Archaeology: From Atlantis to the Walam Olum was published in 2010. He is the founder and director of the Farmington River Archaeological Project, which studies the prehistory of the region in northwest Connecticut. Feder's next book is tentatively called Archaeological Odysseys: 50 sites in the United States You Should See Before You Die, and he is traveling all over the U.S. visiting these sites. View Guest page

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Esteban Fernandez

Esteban Fernandez is a recent graduate of the University of Colorado’s M.A program. Throughout the past five years he worked in a wide variety of field projects in the countries of Belize, Mexico, and the United States. His main research interest lies within the region of Mesoamerica, namely the production of gold artifacts used as provincial tributary payments to the Aztec empire. For the purposes of this research he embraced a multidisciplinary approach that combined ethnohistoric, archaeological and experimental evidence. Currently, he is taking a year off from school in order to explore other career options outside of archeology. View Guest page

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Rowan Flad

Rowan Flad (b. 10.27.1972) is a Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University. His research is currently focused on the emergence and development of complex society during the late Neolithic period and the Bronze Age in China. This research incorporates interests in diachronic change in production processes, the intersection between ritual activity and production, the role of animals in early Chinese society - particularly their use in sacrifice and divination, and the processes involved in social change in general. Recently he has conducted excavations at a salt production site in the eastern Sichuan Basin and archaeological survey in the Chengdu Plain focusing on prehistoric settlement patterns and social evolution in that region. New research is being planned focusing on technological change along the proto-Silk Road in Northwest China (Gansu) during the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age. His publications include articles in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Current Anthropology, The Holocene, Antiquity, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, Journal of Field Archaeology, Asian Perspectives, Journal of East Asian Archaeology, Bulletin of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, Kaogu, and Nanfang minzu kaogu. He co-edited a book on specialization in the series Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, and Climate, Landscapes and Civilizations, published by the American Geophysical Union in 2012. He is the author of Salt Production and Social Hierarchy in Ancient China: An archaeological investigation of specialization in China’s Three Gorges, published by Cambridge University Press in 2011, and Ancient Central China: Centers and Peripheries Along the Yangzi River, also published by Cambridge University Press in 2013. View Guest page

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Dr. Maurizio Forte

Dr. Maurizio Forte, PhD, is William and Sue Gross Professor of Classical Studies Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University and founder of the university’s DIG@Lab (for a digital knowledge of the past). He was professor of World Heritage at the University of California, Merced, and Director of the Virtual Heritage Lab. He was Chief of Research at the Italian National Research Council and their Senior Scientist at the Institute for Technologies Applied to the Cultural Heritage (ITABC), as well as Professor of "Virtual Environments for Cultural Heritage” at the University of Lugano. He received his bachelor’s degree in Ancient History (archaeology), and a Diploma of specialization in Archaeology, from the University of Bologna, and his PhD in Archaeology from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. He has coordinated archaeological fieldwork and research projects in Italy as well as Ethiopia, Egypt, Syria, Kazakhstan, Peru, China, Oman, India, Honduras, Turkey, USA and Mexico. He is editor and author of several books including “Virtual Archaeology” (1996), Virtual Reality in Archaeology (2000), “From Space to Place” (2006), and he has written more than 200 scientific papers. View Guest page

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Michael Gear

Michael Gear received his B.A. and M.A. at Colorado State University specializing in physical anthropology. Around the same time he wrote his first novel. And in all he has published 12 novels and coauthored with Kathleen 23 novels on various historical and anthropological themes. His “Morning River” was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in fiction, and the National Book Award in 1998. And currently the Gears are working on the story for their next prehistory book, “The People of the Thunder,” a novel set as Moundville, Alabama in 1300s. He is currently the Principal Investigator for the Wind River Archaeological Consultants. View Guest page

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Joan H. Geismar

Joan H. Geismar is an urban archaeologist in private practice in the New York City metropolitan area since 1981. Dr. Geismar has worked extensively on 18th and 19th century sites and buried ships. She is a founder and Past President of the Professional Archaeologists of New York City, Inc. (PANYC). View Guest page

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Isaac Gilead

Isaac Gilead is a Professor of Archaeology at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Dr. Gilead received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Hebrew University, Jerusalem in 1974, 1976, and 1982, respectively. His research interests include archaeology of Beer Sheva, the Stone Age archaeology of the southern Levant, the archaeology of the Chalcolithic period, the archaeology of arid zones, and most importantly the archaeology of Nazi extermination centers. He has done extensive fieldwork at Nazi extermination centers in Poland and, specifically, at the operation Reinhardt camps of Bełżec, Sobibór and Treblinka. He also authored and co-authored numerous books and articles that were published in various peer-reviewed journals. View Guest page

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Richard Gould

Dr. Richard Gould is a Professor Emeritus of Archaeology at Brown University and a forensic anthropologist with the federal Disaster Mortuary Operations Recovery Team (DMORT). Since completing his PhD. in Anthropology at the University of California, Berkley in 1965, Dr. Gould studied human cultural and behavioral adaptations to stress, risk, and uncertainty. He came to Brown University as Professor of Anthropology in 1981. After the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, he led trial forensic recoveries at the WTC and full recoveries at “The Station” Nightclub Fire scene in West Warwick, RI, in 2003. Most recently, he assisted with victim identifications and recoveries as a forensic anthropologist with DMORT in Gulfport, MS, and in New Orleans/St. Bernard Parish, LA, immediately following hurricane Katrina. Dr. Gould has published 12 books and monographs as well as numerous papers and articles in peer-reviewed journals. View Guest page

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Dr. Jack Green

Dr. Jack Green is chief curator of the Oriental Institute Museum, part of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (2011 to present) where he manages the permanent collections and program of special exhibits. He recently co-curated two Oriental Institute exhibits: “Picturing the Past: Imaging and Imagining the ancient Middle East” (2012), and “Our Work: Modern Jobs – Ancient Origins” (2013). In addition to overseeing the museum’s transition to a new integrated collections database, he is involved in cultural heritage projects overseas, including the National Museum of Afghanistan – Oriental Institute Partnership Project. He was previously curator of the new ancient Near East gallery at the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford (2007-2011). He is an archaeologist with a PhD from University College London (2006) on the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age cemetery at Tell es-Sa‘idiyeh, Jordan – which is also the focus of a British Museum publication project. His related research interests are in the Bronze and Iron Ages of the southern Levant, histories of archaeology, the archaeology of death and burial, and gender and personal adornment. View Guest page

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Stanton W. Green

Stanton W. Green serves as Dean of the McMurray School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Monmouth University where he is also Professor of Anthropology. Prior to this, he was Dean of the college of Arts and Sciences at Clarion University of Pennsylvania and Professor of Anthropology and Department Chair at the University of South Carolina. He holds a B.A. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. In his capacity as Dean he has forwarded a program to engage the liberal arts and performing arts with career preparation for the 21st century. He has published over 30 major articles and co-edited two major books in anthropology. This scholarship includes diversity and careers in higher education as well as his specialties in archaeology the application of Geographic Information Systems in social science research, and the study of the cultural history of baseball. He has directed major archaeological projects in South Carolina and Ireland, which have included scores of undergraduate and graduate students from the US, Britain and Ireland. View Guest page

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Cody Gregory

Cody Gregory is an Information Systems Technician at John Milner Associates, Inc., currently based at the Army Corps VCP facility in St. Louis, MO. Cody served in the U.S. Air Force from 2003 to 2008 as a Mental Health Technician. He is an Operation Enduring Freedom veteran who deployed to Afghanistan and worked as a Hurricane Katrina responder. He recently received his A.A. degree in Biology from St. Charles Community College and he plans to pursue a B.A. in Environmental Science. Mr. Gregory was originally hired as an archaeological laboratory technician during the first term of the VCP project at the St. Louis lab. He subsequently advanced to the position of lab manager. He is now responsible for managing Information Technologies at VCP and also assists with training and technical support for the digital imaging system. View Guest page

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Dr. Thomas Guderjan

Tom Guderjan is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at The University of Texas at Tyler and the President of Maya Research Program. He also directs MRP’s Blue Creek Archaeological Project in Belize, which focuses on a variety of topics including the structure of Maya cities, landscape archaeology and wetlands agricultural systems. In addition, the project focuses on student training and conservation of archaeological sites in the region. Dr. Guderjan received his PhD from Southern Methodist University and has published numerous books, monographs and papers on the Maya archaeology. View Guest page

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Amy Gusick

Amy Gusick is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her archaeological concentration is on early maritime Pacific Rim hunter-gatherers. She is also interested in formulating models of behavioral variations in the coastal hunter-gatherers and in early migration and mobility into and within the New World. Currently, her fieldwork is centered on Santa Cruz Island, California and on a submerged landscape in the southern Gulf in Baja California. View Guest page

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Frederick "Fritz" Hanselmann

Frederick "Fritz" Hanselmann is Research Faculty and the Chief Underwater Archaeologist/Dive Training Officer with the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. He is also the director of The Meadows Center's Underwater Archaeology and Exploration Initiative. Having worked on underwater sites from a wide variety of time periods, his research ranges from submerged prehistoric deposits in springs and caves to historic shipwrecks in Latin America and the Caribbean, including the wreck of the Quedagh Merchant, abandoned by Captain Kidd in 1699. Fritz led the first-ever archaeological survey of the Chagres River mouth in Panama as part of the Lost Ships of Henry Morgan Project, the search for the famous privateer's sunken ships. He is the Principal Investigator of the Monterrey Shipwreck Project in the Gulf of Mexico, which is the deepest shipwreck excavation ever conducted in North America. Fritz is also the co-director of the Sunken Ships of Colombia project, which focuses on finding, documenting, studying, and managing historic shipwrecks along the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Fritz focuses on capacity building and training for archaeologists and heritage managers in less developed countries, as well as the development of marine protected areas and underwater preserves. View Guest page

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Dr. Sam Hardy

Dr. Sam Hardy is a Research Associate at the Centre for Applied Archaeology at the University College London (UCL) Institute of Archaeology. Dr. Hardy earned a DPhil in Law Studies at the University of Sussex. His professional experience includes archaeological, historical and ethnographic work in Cyprus, Greece and Turkey, NGO work in the Netherlands, and teaching in the UK. He investigates the destruction of cultural and community property; the trade in illicit antiquities; the politics and ethics of cultural heritage work, including archaeological excavation in occupied and secessionist territories; and precarious labor in the cultural heritage industry. His work on the trade in illicit antiquities has focused on the looting and smuggling of cultural property during the Cyprus Conflict. He has traced the development of the trade in parallel with the conflict; identified the relationships between antiquities looting, organized crime and political violence; and examined the impact of policing, policy and clandestine rescue on the trade. View Guest page

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Vance Holliday

Vance Holliday is Professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Geosciences University of Arizona. He received his Ph.D. in Geology at the University of Colorado-Boulder (1982). His research interests extend into geoarchaeology, Paleoindian archaeology and Quaternary landscape evolution. His research areas are focused on the American Southwest and northern New Mexico. Dr. Holliday is also Executive Director of the Argonaut Archaeological Research Fund (AARF) which is dedicated the to study of the earliest peopling of the Greater Southwest. Vance has also done field work in the Pampas of Argentina and the Don River Valley in Russia. He has authored and edited several volumes including Soils in Archaeology: Landscape Evolution and Human Occupation (1992), Paleoindian Geoarchaeology of the Southern High Plains (1997), and Soils and Archaeological Research (2004). View Guest page

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Brent E. Huffman

Brent E. Huffman is an award-winning director, writer, and cinematographer of documentaries and television programs. He is also an assistant professor at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. His work ranges from documentaries aired on The Discovery Channel, The National Geographic Channel, NBC, CNN, PBS and Al Jazeera. He has been making social issue documentaries and environmental films for more than a decade in Asia, Africa and Middle East. Huffman was also an editor of Julia Reichert’s and Steven Bognar’s Primetime Emmy winning PBS documentary series A Lion in the House about children battling cancer. He also recently completed a book about his experiences in China called Life in the Heart of China: Diary from a Forbidden World. Most recently, he completed documentary The Colony for Al Jazeera about China in Africa. He is currently working on two new documentaries in Afghanistan and China. View Guest page

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Bill Iseminger

Bill Iseminger is the Assistant Site Director, curator, and public relations manager at the Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site. He has worked at Cahokia for most of his professional career. Bill received his M.A. from Southern Illinois University (Carbondale). He has written extensively on Cahokia and the Mississippian culture for a variety of professional and popular publications. He has most recently authored the volume Cahokia Mounds, America’s First City. View Guest page

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Dr. Anne Jensen

Dr. Anne Jensen has over 31 years of anthropological fieldwork experience in Alaska. She is currently the PI on the NSF-funded project “Learning From the Past: Archaeology of Nuvuk” which analyzes the excavations of a major Thule cemetery and newly discovered Ipiutak habitation site, as well as smaller NSF-funded projects working with collections from Walakpa and Utqiaġvik. Much of the work on these projects has been done by local and international high school and college students and volunteers. Dr. Jensen’s current research focuses on human adaptation in Arctic and subarctic environments, coastal adaptations in the North, global change effects on the archaeological and paleoecological record, digital archaeology and paleoeconomy and paleoenvironments. She is currently Senior Scientist for UIC Science LLC, where she is responsible for cultural resources issues on Ukpeaġvik Inupiat Corporation (an Alaska Native corporation) lands, as well as an active cultural resource consulting practice. She also manages a contract to run a climate monitoring site for Sandia National Labs and the US Department of Energy. View Guest page

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Dr. Rosemary A. Joyce

Rosemary A. Joyce is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor in the Social Sciences and Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. For more than thirty-five years she engaged in archaeological fieldwork in Honduras, and currently is collaborating in research with Mexican colleagues while continuing research on Honduran collections in European museums. She received the PhD from the University of Illinois-Urbana in 1985, was a curator and faculty member at Harvard University from 1985 to 1994, and moved to Berkeley in 1994 as Director of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology and a member of the anthropology department. She is the author of Gender and Power in Prehispanic Mesoamerica, The Languages of Archaeology, Embodied Lives, and Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, and the forthcoming Material Relations. View Guest page

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Ray Karl

Ray Karl is Professor of Archaeology and Heritage at Bangor University, Wales, United Kingdom. Originally from Vienna, Austria, he moved to Britain over a decade ago. He has worked mostly in later prehistoric 'Celtic' archaeology, both on the European continent and in Britain. His other main research interest is archaeological practice, heritage management, and public archaeology. He has conducted the Austrian study for the “Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe” project, which examined the European archaeological labor market and is currently conducting the Austrian part of the “Studying Archaeology in Europe” project. He has also recently published a major monograph critically examining the neo-positivist foundations of Austrian archaeology (2010), and another one assessing Austrian archaeological heritage management law and practices (2011). View Guest page

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Tom King

Tom King is an archaeologist who has branched out to practice and advocate for heritage or cultural resource management. Dr. King has done research in California and the Micronesian islands, managed consulting groups, helped structure historic preservation systems (Micronesia), overseen federal project review (Advisory Council on Historic Preservation), served as litigant and expert witness in heritage lawsuits, and consulted and taught. Now known for his work with indigenous groups and local communities, he has authored eight books on archaeology and heritage/cultural resource management as well as articles and Internet offerings on heritage topics. His most recent nonfiction book, Our Unprotected Heritage, critiques contemporary cultural resource management and environmental impact assessment. He also conducts archaeological research with The Historic Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), focusing on the 1937 disappearance of aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. View Guest page

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Curtis E. Larsen

Curtis E. Larsen is a geoarcheologist and geomorphologist recently retired from a career with the U.S. Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.). He has had a rich and varied career undertaking both geological and archeological endeavors, combining them whenever possible. Curt received his geological training (B.S.) at the University of Illinois at Urbana. He received his M.A. in anthropology and archeology from Western Washington University and his PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago. He is the author of far-ranging geological as well as archeological papers. His book, Life and Land Use on the Bahrain Islands (1983) is an early example of the fruitful interaction between geology and archeology that has become known as geoarchaeology. Curt had a distinguished career as a consulting archaeologist in the cultural resource management field before moving on to government at the U.S.G.S. Larsen continues to be interested in impacts of sea level variation on archeological resources. View Guest page

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Michael Laughy

Michael Laughy is Assistant Professor of Classics at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA. He holds a BA from the University of New Hampshire in Philosophy, Anthropology (Archaeology), and Latin, and an MA in Greek and Latin Literature from the Washington University in St. Louis. He received his PhD in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology from the University of California, Berkeley. Since 1997, Dr. Laughy’s field work has been mostly focused upon modern and ancient Greece. He currently serves as field supervisor of the Athenian Agora Excavations in Athens, Greece, where he has excavated since 1997. Dr. Laughy’s research interests include the history and archaeology of Archaic and Classical Athens, ancient Greek religion, Greek epigraphy, and world archaeology. His first book, co-authored with Dr. Floris van den Eijnde of Utrecht University, is entitled Cult and Society in Early Athens: Rituals, State Formation, and Group Identity in Attica, 1000-600 B.C.E., and is due out next year. View Guest page

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Paula Kay Lazrus

Paula Kay Lazrus is the current President of the AIA’s New York Society and an Assistant Professor at St. John’s University. She received her B.A. in Anthropology at University of Pennsylvania, M.A. in Anthropology at Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. at Boston University. She has worked, lived, and traveled extensively in Italy over the past thirty years. Her research interests range from the protection and conservation of antiquities to changing land-use patterns in Italy, and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software as a tool for better visualizing and understanding past. She is also very involved in the exciting and stimulating world of the Reacting to the Past pedagogy which gives students a challenging way to take command of their studies through intense role playing activities organized around pivotal events in history and the documents and literature that surround them. View Guest page

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Stephen H. Lekson

Stephen H. Lekson is Curator of Archaeology (Museum of Natural History) and Professor of Anthropology, University of Colorado. He has directed more than 20 archaeological projects across the Southwest. Dr. Lekson's publications include numerous articles and several major volumes including A History of the Ancient Southwest (2009), The Architecture of Chaco Canyon (2007), and Archaeology of the Mimbres Region (2006). Steve lectures extensively on Southwestern archaeology at professional and popular venues. View Guest page

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Sandra L. Lopez Varela

Sandra L. Lopez Varela is a full-time research professor and co-founder of the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Morelos (UAEM), Mexico. She completed her undergraduate degree at the Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, and then obtained her M.A. in Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology of the University College London, and her Ph.D. in Archaeology at the University of London. She received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in 2012. She is currently holding the Archaeology Seat of the American Anthropological Association. She has served as President of the Society for Archaeological Sciences (2009-2011) and as President of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation-Mexico (2008-2010). Since 2009, she is a Member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences, Arts, Technology and Humanities. View Guest page

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Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach

Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach is Professor of Geography at the George Mason University. She received her B.A. from California State University-Chico (1982), M.A and Ph.D. from University of Minnesota-Minneapolis (1984, 1990). Her research and teaching specialties are in Hydrology and Water Quality, Geoarchaeology, Earth Systems Science, Spatial Statistics, Global Change, and Gender and Science. Dr. Luzzadder Beach has conducted field research in California, Iceland, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Turkey, and Syria. She has published numerous book chapters and journal articles spanning fields from geography, geology, and archaeology to ethnobiology. View Guest page

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Dr. Allan Maca

Dr. Allan Maca is an archaeologist, historian, and social scientist affiliated with Colgate University. His current research projects focus on the study of ancient cities, architecture, ritual plants, and the philosophy of science. He received his PhD from Harvard University and has done archaeology in Israel, Central America, California, and Kenya. He continues to work in Latin America, is fluent in Spanish, and for fifteen years has led excavations at the ancient Maya city of Copan in Honduras. Allan has appeared in documentary films and television, most recently for Lucasfilm and the History Channel. He grew up in and still lives in New York City. View Guest page

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Dru McGill

Dru McGill is a PhD candidate in the Indiana University Department of Anthropology and Associate Faculty at Indiana University South Bend. His recent research focuses on late-prehistoric peoples of the American Midwest and social-context archaeology, with special foci in cultural property law and archaeological ethics. He is a former 6-year member of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) Committee on Ethics where he acted as an organizer of the SAA Ethics Bowl. He is co-author of the book “Ethics in Action: Case Studies in Archaeological Dilemmas” (2008). He is currently a member of the World Archaeological Congress (WAC) Committee on Ethics and was recently elected Treasurer of WAC. View Guest page

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Dr. Thomas McGovern

Dr. Thomas McGovern is Professor of Archaeology at City University of New York Graduate Center and Hunter College. He received his PhD at Columbia University in 1979. Dr. McGovern specializes in zooarchaeology and has extensive fieldwork experience in North America, Europe, E. Arctic and Caribbean with a major focus on the European expansion of the Viking Age (c 800-1000 CE) into a very diverse set of North Atlantic island ecosystems and the subsequent dynamics of human impact, climate change, and inter-cultural contacts. He is one of the founders of the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization (NABO) and its coordinator since 1992. He also directs the Hunter College Zooarchaeology lab, and is an Associate Director of the Human Ecodymanic Research Center at the CUNY Graduate Center. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Kate McMahon

Kate McMahon serves as the Laboratory Supervisor for the Veterans Curation Project (VCP). She is employed at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (St. Louis District) and provides training and oversight for artifact rehabilitation for the three VCP labs. She completed her undergraduate work at the College of Wooster with a major in Archaeology and minors in Geology, Anthropology, and Sociology. Her honor's thesis focused on the Late Bronze Age-Early Iron Age Transition Period in Ireland. Ms. McMahon has participated in numerous archaeological investigations throughout the southwestern United States. These include surveys and excavations throughout California and Arizona; including the La Osa Archaeological Survey (Red Rock, AZ) and the Joint County Courts Cemetery Excavation Project (Tucson, Arizona). Kate received a National Science Foundation Grant to excavate at the Athienou Archaeological Site, in Cyprus. View Guest page

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Francis P. McManamon

Francis P. McManamon is the Executive Director of the Center for Digital Antiquity, an organization devoted to broadening and improving the ease of access to the archaeological information and to the long-term preservation of archaeological information. He also holds a position of a Research Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. View Guest page

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Bernard K. Means

Bernard K. Means has a B.A. in Anthropology from Occidental College and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Arizona State University. His dissertation research involved applying new theories and cutting-edge technologies to American Indian village sites from southwestern Pennsylvania, many excavated during the 1930s by New Deal archaeologists. Dr. Means's scholarly pursuits include reconstructing American Indian village life from cross-cultural studies of village spatial and social organizations, the research potential of archaeological collections, and the history of archaeology across the Americas, especially during the Great Depression. He is author of Circular Villages of the Monongahela Tradition (2007) and editor of and contributor to the Shovel Ready: Archaeology and Roosevelt’s New Deal for America (2013), as well as numerous articles on the Monongahela tradition and New Deal archaeology. Dr. Means currently teaches archaeology at the School of World Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University and is director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory, which is creating three-dimensional digital models of archaeological objects. View Guest page

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David Meltzer

David Meltzer is Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Southern Methodist University. Dr. Meltzer received his Ph.D. at the University of Washington (1984). His research interests center on the origins, antiquity and adaptations of the first Americans who colonized the North American continent at the end of the Pleistocene (Ice Age). He seeks to explore how hunter-gatherers met the challenges of moving across and adapting to the vast, ecologically diverse landscape of Late Glacial North America, during a time of significant climate change. Dr. Meltzer is the author of numerous books including Folsom (2006), Search for the First Americans (1993), and First Peoples in a New World: Colonizing Ice Age America (2009). Dr. Meltzer is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. View Guest page

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Terry Norris

Terry Norris is a Senior District Archaeologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District. He received his PhD in Colonial Studies at St. Louis University. Terry’s interests are in the prehistory and colonial heritage of the central Mississippi Valley as well as in 19th century rivercraft and historic cartography. Dr. Norris is president of the Cahokia Mounds Museum Society and serves on the Board of the St. Louis Science Center. View Guest page

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Dr. Beth O’Leary

Space Archaeology and Heritage expert Dr. Beth O’Leary has investigated the material culture and history of the early space age (c. 1957 – 1972) and its context in the Cold War. Her interests include iconic space sites and artefacts, focusing on the lunar landscape. As of July 2014, Dr. O’Leary is Professor Emerita in the Anthropology Department at New Mexico State University (NMSU) where she taught for 23 years. For the last 14 years she has been involved with the cultural heritage of outer space and the preservation of the Apollo lunar sites. She is one of the leaders in the emerging field of space archaeology and heritage and has been interviewed and/or written for The Washington Post, NY Times, Smithsonian Magazine, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, BBC, CBC, Le ciel et espace and other international media. Her work includes The Handbook of Space Engineering, Archaeology and Heritage with A. Darrin, eds. 2009 (CRC Taylor and Francis); The Archaeology and Heritage of Human Space Exploration with P.J. Capelotti (2014 Springer, in press) and forthcoming in 2015, In the Shadows of Saturn V: Reflections of Apollo, with Lisa Westwood and M. Wayne Donaldson, University Press of Florida. View Guest page

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Kathleen O’Neal

Kathleen O’Neal received her B.A. from California State University in Bakersfield, and her M.A. from California University in Chico. She conducted PhD studies at the University of California in LA and did post-graduate studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel. In the 80’s she worked for the US Department of Interior as the Wyoming State Historian, and later as the Archaeologist for Wyoming, Kansas, and Nebraska. She has twice been the recipient of the federal government’s “Special Achievement Award” for outstanding management of our nation’s cultural heritage. She has been writing full-time since 1986 and has over 100 non-fiction publications in the fields of archaeology and history, authored 9 novels, and coauthored with her husband 23 international bestsellers. View Guest page

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Charles E. Orser, Jr.

Charles E. Orser, Jr., is an anthropological historical archaeologist who investigates the modern world as it was created after about 1492. He gained his experience in historical archaeology in the United States (eastern and southern), Europe (Ireland), and South America (Brazil). He is the author of over 90 professional articles and a number of books, including Historical Archaeology, A Historical Archaeology of the Modern World, The Archaeology of Race and Racialization in Historic America, Race and Practice in Archaeological Interpretation, and Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon. He is also the founder and continuing editor of the International Journal of Historical Archaeology. His research interests include historical archaeology and anthropology; post-Columbian archaeology; practice, network, and sociospatial theory; globalization and consumerism; social inequality, discrimination, and poverty. His regional interest is the Atlantic world. View Guest page

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Laurie Ott

Laurie Ott is President of the University Health Care Foundation, a nonprofit organization for patient care in Augusta, Georgia. The endowed Foundation provides many community benefits through including support of the area’s only certified Breast Health Center. Ms. Ott received her BA in Latin American Studies from George Washington University and an M.A. in Communications from Gonzaga University. Ms. Ott was the founding Executive Director of the CSRA Wounded Warrior Care Project, a community based model for returning U.S. service members from Iraq and Afghanistan. From 1994 to 2007, Ms. Ott was an anchor and reporter at WRDW, the CBS affiliate in Augusta, where she won numerous reporting awards, including the Edward R. Murrow Investigative Reporting award. Laurie has also been honored with the Associated Press and Georgia Association of Broadcasters reporting awards. In 2010 she received the Department of the Army Commander’s Award for Public Service at Fort Gordon, GA. View Guest page

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Tate Paulette

Tate Paulette is an archaeologist, specializing in Mesopotamia and the ancient Near East. His research revolves around the themes of risk, power, and inequality, with a particular focus on agricultural practices, human-environment dynamics, and gastro-politics. As an undergraduate, he studied Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh, and he is now a PhD Candidate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His doctoral dissertation is a study of grain storage practices in Early Bronze Age (3000-2000 BC) Mesopotamia. He has conducted archaeological fieldwork in Syria, Egypt, Turkey, Cyprus, Scotland, and the United States. His current research also includes an effort to model the growth and collapse of cities in Mesopotamia using agent-based computer simulations, an examination of early administrative devices using CT technology, and an attempt to recreate Sumerian beer. View Guest page

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Dr. Mike Parker Pearson

Dr. Mike Parker Pearson is one of Europe's leading prehistorians. His research domain extends across Britain and Denmark. He has also worked in Madagascar. Dr. Pearson has specialized in the study of later prehistory, especially Neolithic and Bronze Age societies. He earned his BA at Southampton University and continued towards a PhD at Cambridge. His professional career included serving an Inspector of Monuments for English Heritage, and moving on to an academic position at Sheffield University, where he worked for 22 years. Michael joined the faculty at University College London in 2012 as Professor of British Later Prehistory. He is the author and editor of 18 volumes, in addition to numerous scholarly papers, Dr. Pearon’s work is widely cited and he is recognized as a leading authority on death and symbolism in the prehistoric world. He has pioneered archaeological investigations in the Hebrides of Scotland. In 2003 he began work on the Stonehenge Riverside Project, which has revolutionized our understanding of the history, use and significance of one of the world's most famous and intriguing archaeological monuments. Currently Dr. Pearson is engaged in re-assessing the role of the Beaker people in English prehistory. View Guest page

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Dr. Ekaterina “Kate” Pechenkina

Dr. Ekaterina “Kate” Pechenkina was born in Tashkent, Uzbekestan, then the Soviet Union, in 1972. She graduated from Moscow State University with an MS in Biology and Anthropology in 1994. That same year, she came to the US to begin graduate studies at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Kate began fieldwork in Peru in 1997, and then switched to China in 1998. She received her PhD in 2002 from UM and joined Queens College-CUNY in 2003. She has recently received a job offer from ANU and will be moving to Australia in two weeks. Kate has 3 kids, ages 18, 12, and 11 months. View Guest page

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Tom Penders

Tom Penders has been an archaeologist since 1984, working throughout Florida and also in Arizona, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Minnesota, New Mexico and Belize. He is currently the cultural resources manager for the 45th Space Wing, USAF at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. He also heads a small CRM firm called Thomas Penders and Associates and runs volunteer archaeological research projects on weekends from January to April as part of the Indian River Anthropological Society, a local chapter of the Florida Anthropological Society. They have developed a partnership with the Brevard County Environmentally Endangered Lands Program, conducting archaeological research projects on their lands and assisting them with their management of cultural resources. Tom’s research interests are in aerospace archaeology, the Indian River Cultural Area, faunal artifact analysis, and wet site archaeology. In addition to his personal life, he is the father of Becky who is 15 years old. She has bilateral Anophthalmia (blind, she has no eyes), has epilepsy and is autistic. Tom and his wife Nell have been married for 26 years. View Guest page

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Dr. Peter Peregrine

Dr. Peregrine is a Professor of Anthropology at Lawrence University. His research focuses on “big questions” of human history: Why did people come to live in cities? How do coercive leaders maintain their power? What happens when people from very different cultural and linguistic backgrounds come to live together? He has pursued answers to these questions in a variety of different ways—from archaeological excavation to complex cross-cultural statistical analyses. Most recently he has been working with other scholars at the Santa Fe Institute to integrate archaeological, linguistic, and genetic information to understand how modern humans expanded across the earth in the last forty to fifty thousand years and, more specifically, how the diversity of human languages emerged in the last twenty thousand years. In addition to writing academic books, Dr. Peregrine has recently self-published an e-book aimed at the casual reader entitled, What Happened in Prehistory? exploring five major “revolutions” in human life, from the origin of our genus to the Modern Age. Two other books, Why Anthropology Matters and Americans are WEIRD are due out by the end of the year. View Guest page

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Dr Aleks Pluskowski

Dr Aleks Pluskowski teaches the archaeology of later medieval Europe and crusading at the University of Reading. His interests include exploring ecological diversity across medieval Europe, focused on zooarchaeology and inter-disciplinary perspectives of human-animal relations. He is the author of Wolves and the Wilderness in the Middle Ages (Boydell, 2006), which compares human responses to wolves and their shared environments in medieval Britain and Scandinavia. He has published several articles on responses to the wolf in the Middle Ages, as well as on the treatment of exotic animals, hunting space and broader understandings of predation in medieval society. He is currently preparing two volumes: an ecological survey of medieval Europe, and a new cultural history of the European wolf. Aleks is regularly involved in organising and moderating sessions at international archaeology and medievalist conferences. View Guest page

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James Potter

James Potter is a principle investigator for PaleoWest, archaeological consulting firm. He received his B.A. from the University of California at Berkley and his Ph.D. from Arizona State University in 1997. Since then he has worked on projects throughout the American Southwest, including the Animas-La Plata Reservoir Project in southwest Colorado, the Large-site Mapping Project on the Ute Mountain Reservation, and the Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project in Northwestern New Mexico. Dr. Potter authored and coauthored numerous books and monographs, as well as published articles in various journals, including American Antiquity, Kiva Journal Anthropological Archaeology, and the Journal of Field Archaeology. His research interests include early village formation in the American Southwest, landscape studies, faunal analysis, hunting and feasting as social practice, identity construction, and American Indian involvement in archaeology. View Guest page

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Dr. Timothy Pugh

Dr. Timothy Pugh is an Associate Professor in the Anthropology Department at CUNY Queens. His interests include the Maya, architecture, spatial analysis, ritual, social memory, and cultural contact. His archaeological research focuses upon reconstructing the political geography of 15th to 17th century central Petén, Guatemala. Dr. Pugh obtained is PhD in Anthropology in 2001 at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. His dissertation examined how the Kowoj of Petén utilized ritual architecture and performances as foundations of ethnic identity. He conducted excavations at Zacpetén, a site that lies in the former Kowoj region, and found that in the mid-15th century, the ceremonial architecture of Zacpetén was reconstructed to resemble that of Mayapán. He compared the architecture and activity areas of Zacpetén with those of sites both inside and outside Petén to understand how ritual practices and architecture helped to differentiate the Kowoj from other ethnic groups in Petén. This project is significant beyond the clarification of historical facts as it adds to the understanding of how ritual performances contribute to the construction of ethnic boundaries; how history is used as a foundation of social identity; and the processes of ethnogenesis that follow the collapse of complex societies. View Guest page

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Chris Pulliam

Chris Pulliam is currently an archaeologist and team leader in the St. Louis District Curation and Archives Analysis Branch as well as the assistant director of the Corps’ Mandatory Center of Expertise for the Curation and Management of Archaeological Collections. Prior to working with the Corps, he was an archaeologist with the American Archaeology Division at the University of Missouri, Columbia, and the manager of the Missouri Archaeological Society. Over the past 19 year he has worked on numerous archaeological collections management projects. He also served as an archaeologist on JPAC and was involved in the recovery attempts of Vietnam War missing in action military personnel. View Guest page

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Dr. Anne Pyburn

Dr. Anne Pyburn is Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University and Vice-President of World Archaeological Congress. She received her M.A. and PhD in Anthropology at University of Arizona, Tuscon in 1984 and 1988, respectively. Currently she is a director of the Center for Archaeology in the Public Interest, Chau Hiix Project in Belize and Principal Investigator of MATRIX Project. She authored, co-authored and co-edited numerous books and articles, including “Ungendering Civilization: Reinterpreting the Archaeological Record” and “Prehistoric Maya Community And Settlement At Nohmul, Belize.” View Guest page

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Sean M. Rafferty

Trained as a specialist in the archaeology of prehistoric Eastern North America, Sean Rafferty has conducted excavations throughout New York State on a variety of archaeological sites and conducted substantial laboratory research, using techniques from chemistry and physics, to understand the function of ancient artifacts. Rafferty received his bachelor's in anthropology from Hartwick College (1990), and his master's (1994) and doctorate (2001) in anthropology from Binghamton University. He joined UAlbany as an assistant professor of anthropology in 2002. Within the region of Eastern North America, he is particularly interested in the interplay between ritual practices and cultural variability, especially within the area of mortuary practices and smoking rituals. He has research interests in the field of archaeometry, with a specialty in residue analysis using chromotographic approaches. These research interests coincide with his ongoing investigation into the origins of tobacco smoking in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. Together with Robb Mann, Sean is the editor of Smoking and Culture. View Guest page

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Donald Redford

Donald Redford is a professor of Egyptology in the departments of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and History at the Pennsylvania State University. He is an internationally renowned scholar of ancient Egypt and Biblical studies, and a noted expert on the 18th Dynasty Amarna period. Dr. Redford is the author of several books, including Akhenaten, The Heretic King (Princeton, 1984) and Israel, Canaan & Egypt in Ancient Times (Princeton, 1992), and numerous articles. He has been frequently featured in series and documentaries on A&E, The History Channel, and the BBC. Prof. Redford has been the director of the Akhenaten Temple Project since 1972. View Guest page

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Dr. Julian Richards

Dr. Julian Richards, is Director of the Archaeology Data Service, and Co-Director of the ejournal Internet Archaeology. Julian first came to York to take part in the Coppergate Viking excavations, and returned in 1986 to lecture on Anglo-Saxon and Viking archaeology. The Department has grown tremendously from when he first joined, when he was only one of 5 staff members with around a dozen students. It now has over 60 staff, with over 300 undergraduates and 100 graduate students. Julian's involvement in archaeological computing began in 1980 when he started his PhD research studying pre-Christian Anglo-Saxon burial ritual. In 1985 he co-authored the first textbook in archaeological computing for Cambridge University Press, and has subsequently written numerous papers and edited a number of books on the applications of information technology in archaeology, as well as on Anglo-Saxon and Viking archaeology. He is also Director of York's Centre for Digital Heritage, and from October 2013 he will be the founding Director of The White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities (WRoCAH). View Guest page

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Chelsea Rose

Chelsea Rose is an historical archaeologist and adjunct faculty member at Southern Oregon University. Born and raised in northern California, Chelsea has been consumed with a love of history and archaeology from an early age. She focuses her research on the early settlement and development of the American West, and often invites students and the local community to join her on archaeological digs across the Pacific Northwest. Chelsea received her undergraduate degree at the University of Oregon, and her graduate degree at Sonoma State University. This is Chelsea's second season with Time Team America. View Guest page

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Dr. Tom Scanlon

Dr. Tom Scanlon received his Ph.D. in Classics at Ohio State University in 1978, and is the current Department Chair and Professor of Classics and Comparative Ancient Civilizations/Literature at the University of California. His teaching interests encompass most areas of Greek and Roman literature and culture, including courses on religion, gender, mythology, ancient sports, and most genres of Greek and Latin literature. He has taught graduate seminars on the Roman Historians, Thucydides, and Sallust. His research specializations include ancient Greek and Roman historical writing, Greek and Roman Sports, Gender and Sexuality, and Religion in the ancient world. He is a participant in the Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics (UCI, UCR, UCSD). Dr. Scanlon is the author or editor of publications such as Oxford Readings in Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds and Eros and Greek Athletics. Ancient authors he would want to bring along if he were stranded on a deserted island include (in alphabetical order): Aristophanes, Catullus, Euripides, Herodotus, Homer, Plato, Sallust, Sappho, Sophocles, Thucydides, Vergil. On second thought ... he'll take his iPad. View Guest page

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Lawrence H. Schiffman

Lawrence H. Schiffman is a Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Professor of Judaic Studies at Yeshiva University. He received his BA, MA, and PhD degrees from the department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University. He taught for 39 years at New York University, where he was Edelman Professor of Hebrew and chair of the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies. He is a specialist in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Judaism in late antiquity, the history of Jewish law, and Talmudic literature. View Guest page

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Douglas Scott

Douglas Scott is an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Anthropology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Doug received his PhD. in Anthropology from the University of Colorado, Boulder (1977). Doug specializes in nineteenth century military sites archaeology and forensic archaeology. He is particularly noted for his expertise in battlefield archaeology and firearms identification having worked on more than 40 battlefield sites, including Palo Alto, Sand Creek, Big Hole, Bear Paw, Wilson’s Creek, Pea Ridge, Centralia, and Santiago de Cuba. He was awarded the Department of the Interior's Distinguished Service Award in 2002 for his innovative research in battlefield archaeology that started with his work at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Doug has also been involved with human rights and forensic investigations since the early 1990s. He has worked with the United Nations and various human rights organizations in El Salvador, Croatia, Rwanda, Cyprus, Iraq, and Canada. View Guest page

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Linda Scott-Cummings

Linda Scott-Cummings is founder (1972) and president of Paleo Research Institute (PRI) in Golden, Colorado. The firm originally focused on analyzing the botany at archaeological sites through scientific analysis and interpretations of pollen and seeds. Dr. Scott-Cummings received her Ph.D. in 1980. PRI’s services have expanded to include a variety of specialized human subsistence resource studies, including phytoliths (small silica casts of cells in plants), starch, protein residue, chemical assays of organic remains, and radiocarbon dating. PRI is now integrating multiple analyses to model past climates and to interpret the composition and human utilization of past environments. PRI has 10 employees and performs analyses for clients world-wide. Linda continues to develop new methods and has transferred her skills by offering workshops (at Colorado State University) and designing a series of on-line courses about archaeobotany and past diets and environments (www.paleoresearch.com). View Guest page

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Lynne Sebastian

Lynne Sebastian is an archaeologist specializing in the American Southwest, and has carried out fieldwork in New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Arizona. Her publications include The Chaco Anasazi, a book about the political and economic structure of the Chaco system, and an edited volume entitled Archaeology & Cultural Resource Management: Visions for the Future. Dr. Sebastian received her Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico where she currently holds an adjunct associate professorship. She is a former New Mexico State Archaeologist and State Historic Preservation Officer. She is currently Director of Historic Preservation Programs at the SRI Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing historic preservation through education, training, technical assistance, and research. Dr. Sebastian is a past President of the Society for American Archaeology and the current President-elect of the Register of Professional Archaeologists. View Guest page

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Sarah Sherwood

Sarah Sherwood is currently an Assistant Professor in the Environment Studies Program at Sewanee: the University of the south, where is also serves as the University Archaeologist. She received her PhD from the University of Tennessee in 2001. Prior to coming to Sewanee Dr. Sherwood worked as a consulting Geoarchaeologist and Associate Director for the Archaeology Research Laboratory at the University of Tennessee. She has conducted field work across the Eastern US and overseas in Iceland, South Africa, Western and Eastern Europe. She is currently working in two very different parts of the world, on the Southern Cumberland Plateau of Tennessee and Alabama and in the Balkans of Eastern Europe. View Guest page

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Hampton Sides

Hampton Sides is the author of numerous bestselling works of narrative history and is an award-winning contributor to such publications as Outside, National Geographic, and The New Yorker. His 2001 World War II narrative Ghost Soldiers has sold more than a million copies worldwide. Blood and Thunder, his history of Kit Carson and the conquest of the West, was named one of the Ten Best Books of 2007 by Time magazine. Hampton's most recent bestseller, Hellhound on His Trail, about the hunt for MLK assassin James Earl Ray, is under development with Universal Pictures. A frequent lecturer at universities and literary conferences and a consultant to numerous PBS documentaries, Sides is a fellow of Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, and the Edwards Media Program at Stanford, and serves on the board of directors of the Author’s Guild. A native of Memphis and a graduate of Yale, he lives in Santa Fe. View Guest page

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Dr. Adam T. Smith

Adam T. Smith is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University and Director of Graduate Studies for the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies. He is also a senior fellow at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU. Smith holds a Ph.D. (1996) and M.A. (1993) from the University of Arizona's Department of Anthropology and an M.Phil. (1991) from the Social and Political Science Faculty at Cambridge University. He is the recipient of research awards from an array of public and private institutions including the National Science Foundation. Dr. Smith is a co-founder of the joint American-Armenian Project for the Archaeology and Geography of Ancient Transcaucasian Societies (Project ArAGATS). His research is currently focused on the emergence of complex societies in the South Caucasus and the materiality of political authority more broadly. He is the author of a number of books including his most recent The Political Machine: Assembling Sovereignty in the Bronze Age Caucasus (Princeton University Press). View Guest page

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Dr. Claire Smith

Dr. Claire Smith is President of the World Archaeological Congress and Professor at Flinders University, Australia. She received her PhD in archaeology at the University of New England in 1996. She is the recipient of Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship, held a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum for Natural History and was a visiting scholar at universities in South Africa and the USA, including Columbia University, New York. Claire authored, co-authored and co-edited nine books and more than 40 refereed articles in English, Spanish, Catalan and Japanese. Her research interests include the impact of the Northern Territory Emergency Response on Aboriginal identity in the Barunga region, and an analysis of the possession and distribution of Ngadjuri knowledge, and how this articulates with notions of identity, heritage and land use. View Guest page

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Michael E. Smith

Michael E. Smith is Professor of Anthropology at Arizona State University. He is an archaeologist who has directed fieldwork projects at numerous Aztec sites in central Mexico, pioneering the excavation of houses and the study of daily life. He has published six books and numerous scholarly articles on the Aztecs; his books include Aztec City-State Capitals (2008), and the population textbook, The Aztecs (3rd edition, 2012). In addition to the study of the domestic realm, Smith’s research in Mexico has focused on Aztec cities and urbanism, imperialism, and economics. He also carries out interdisciplinary and comparative research on cities and urban life, from deep history to the present. View Guest page

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Mark Staniforth

Mark Staniforth is an Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University and Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He received his M.A. in History from the University of Sydney (1993) and his Ph.D. from Flinders University, Adelaide (1999). Mark is one of leading maritime archaeologists with extensive experience in historical archaeology, maritime archaeology, museum and heritage studies gained during a thirty-year career. He is the author of numerous articles as well as books, including “Material Culture and Consumer Society.” He is an elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and a member of two International Scientific Committees - International Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management and International Committee on Underwater Cultural Heritage. Currently Mark is a member of the Bach Dang and Van Don Battlefield Research Projects as well as one of the three Chief Investigators for The Australian Historic Shipwreck Protection Project. View Guest page

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Charles Stanish

Charles Stanish is the Director of the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology and professor of Anthropology at UCLA. He specializes in the development of complex political and economic systems in the pre-modern world. He has worked extensively throughout South America. His theoretical work focuses on the roles that trade, war, and labor play in the evolution of human cooperation and society. He holds the Lloyd Cotsen Chair at UCLA, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States. View Guest page

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Julie K. Stein

Julie K. Stein is Executive Director of the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington, where she remains Professor in the Department of Anthropology. Julie holds M.A and Ph.D. degrees (University of Minnesota). Her research focuses on geoarchaeology, especially sediments at archaeological sites and archaeological stratigraphy. She explores prehistoric coastal adaptations of the Northwest Coast, and the geoarchaeology of historical sites. She has published several books on Northwest Coast shell midden sites, including Is it a House? Archaeological Excavations at English Camp, San Juan Islands, Washington (2011), Vashon Island Archaeology: A View from Burton Acres Shell Midden (2002), and Deciphering a Shell Midden (1992). The volume Effects of Scale on Archaeological and Geoscientific Perspectives examines interdisciplinary research; and Sediments in Archaeological Context assesses archaeological sediments laid down in various environmental settings. View Guest page

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Peter Stone

Peter Stone is Head of School of Arts and Cultures and Professor of Heritage Studies in the International Center for Culture and Heritage Studies at Newcastle University. In 2003 he worked as adviser to the Ministry of Defense regarding the identification and protection of the archaeological cultural heritage of Iraq. He has remained active in working with the military to refine attitudes and develop processes for the better protection of cultural property in times of conflict. Peter has worked extensively overseas and advised UNESCO on the development of the World Heritage Education Program and helped draft the World Heritage in Young Hands kit. He has published widely on heritage management, interpretation and education, including The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq (2008) with Joanne Farchkh Bajjaly, and edited Cultural Heritage, Ethics and the Military (2011). View Guest page

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Omar Sultan

Mr. Omar Sultan is an expert on Afghan culture and heritage. He served as Deputy Minister of Information and Culture to the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan from 2005 through 2011. He holds Bachelor and Master Degrees in Art and Archaeology from Aristotelian University in Thessaloniki, Greece. A brilliant spokesperson and representative for the preservation of Afghan cultural heritage, Mr. Sultan is a native of Kabul and participated in several important excavations in Afghanistan in the 1970s. He currently lives in North Carolina and is a founding member of Americans for Permanent Peace in Afghanistan. View Guest page

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Amanda Sutphin

Amanda Sutphin is Director of Archaeology, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). The agency safeguards NYC’s architectural, historical and cultural heritage. Its Archaeology Department oversees the city’s archeological resources. Ms. Sutphin (M.A. Pennsylvania State University) has worked as an archaeologist in New York City for over sixteen years. View Guest page

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Dr. James Tabor

Dr. James Tabor is Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte where he is professor of Christian Origins and Ancient Judaism. Since earning his PhD. at the University of Chicago in 1981, Tabor combined work on ancient texts with extensive fieldwork in archaeology in Israel and Jordan, including Qumran, Sepphoris, Masada, and Wadi el-Yabis in Jordan. Over the past decade he has teamed up with Shimon Gibson to excavate “John the Baptist” cave at Suba, the “Tomb of the Shroud” discovered in 2000, and ongoing work at Mt. Zion. Most recently, Tabor, along with Rami Arav, have been involved in the re-exploration of two tombs in East Taploit; the controversial “Jesus Tomb” and a related tomb less than 200 feet away that has ossuary inscriptions Tabor and Arav interpret as Judaeo-Christian. His most recent book, co-authored with Simcha Jacobovici, is "The Jesus Discovery: The New Archaeological Find that Reveals the Birth of Christianity." View Guest page

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Dr. Laura Tedesco

Dr. Laura Tedesco serves as Cultural Heritage Program Manager for the U.S. State Department in Afghanistan. She was posted in Kabul for 16 months where she oversaw and guided US efforts to support and preserve Afghan cultural heritage sites and monuments. Dr. Tedesco holds a PhD in Anthropology from New York University where her area of study included the Near East and Central Asia. Before joining the State Department, Dr. Tedesco worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She has conducted field research in the Republics of Georgia and Armenia, as well as in Syria and other nations in western and south Asia. View Guest page

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Ben Thomas

Ben Thomas is the Director of Programs for the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) in Boston and an Assistant Professor in the Liberal Arts Department at Berklee College of Music. As Director of Programs for the AIA, Ben is responsible for the Institute’s outreach activities including International Archaeology Day and the 118-year old lecture program, the site preservation program, the 109 AIA local societies, all grants and awards, and membership. Ben is a Maya specialist with a specific interest in Ancient Maya settlements and architecture. He received his Ph.D. from Boston University after several years of fieldwork in the jungles and swamps of Belize and Guatemala. Recently, he has been trying to understand how the ancient Maya perceived their landscape and how this perception impacted the development of their communities. At Berklee he introduces students to Mesoamerican art and archaeology and some of the great archaeological discoveries that have been made in the last 300 years. View Guest page

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Michael S. (Sonny) Trimble

Michael S. (Sonny) Trimble is the Chief of the Curation and Archives Analysis Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), St. Louis District. He is also the Director of the Veterans Curation Program (VCP). Sonny received his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Missouri, Columbia . His specialties include North American archaeology, archaeological forensics, collections and archives management, and GIS. Sonny’s group assisted the Department of Justice for 2.5 years on a Presidential mission to gather and analyze forensic data documenting murder and crimes against humanity carried out by Iraq’s former regime under Saddam Hussein. The results of these scientific investigations and reports provided the Iraqi legal system with forensic evidence for the prosecution by the Iraqi High Tribunal. He played a critical role in procuring the funding for the VCP program and is responsible for its overall operation. View Guest page

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Jason Ur

Jason Ur is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. He specializes in early urbanism, landscape archaeology, and remote sensing. He has directed field surveys in Syria, Iraq, Turkey, and Iran. He is the author of Urbanism and Cultural Landscapes in Northeastern Syria: The Tell Hamoukar Survey, 1999-2001 (2010). Currently he is leading an archaeological survey in the Kurdistan Region of northern Iraq, and preparing a history of Mesopotamian cities. View Guest page

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Diana di Zerega Wall

Diana di Zerega Wall is Professor at the City University of New York (CUNY Graduate Center) and has directed numerous projects in historic archaeology. She is currently excavating Seneca Village in Central Park and is co-author of the award winning book Unearthing Gotham: The Archaeology of New York City (2001). View Guest page

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Cheryl Ward

Cheryl Ward is a maritime archaeologist and director of the Center for Archaeology & Anthropology at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina. She holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from Texas A&M University, and an M.S. in Bioarchaeology from the University of London’s Institute of Archaeology. Dr. Ward is principal investigator for maritime artifacts at the pharaonic port at Wadi Gawasis on the Red Sea in Egypt and recently reconstructed and sailed an ancient Egyptian seagoing ship. Past projects include remote surveys of the Black Sea; reconstruction of the world's oldest planked boats at Abydos, Egypt, and directing an underwater archaeological survey off the coast of Turkey. Her published works include Sacred and Secular: Ancient Egyptian Ship Construction (2000, AIA Monographs series), The Philosophy of Shipbuilding: Conceptual Approaches to the Study of Wooden Ships (2004, Texas A&M University Press), and many articles in both scholarly and popular journals. View Guest page

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Dr. Meg Watters

Dr. Meg Watters specializes in 3D visualization of remotely sensed and excavated data for a new perspective on non-invasive modeling and analysis of archaeological sites. She focuses on archaeological landscape visualization and development of technological applications to help solve archaeological problems and for site preservation and planning. While most of her work is with remote sensing applications in archaeology, Meg has worked with a number of television productions including National Geographic, Discovery Channel, PBS, and the BBC. Meg has participated in archaeological research around the world including the Mediterranean, Morocco, Egypt, Sudan, the UK, Spain, Peru, Mexico, and the USA. View Guest page

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Donald J. Weir

Donald J. Weir is CEO and founder (1988) of Commonwealth Cultural Resources Group, Inc. (CCRG). Don holds an MA degree in Anthropology from Michigan State University. CCRG is a full-service cultural resources firm with headquarters in Jackson, Michigan, and offices in New York, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and, Illinois. In 2009 CCRG acquired Coastal Carolina Research, Inc., of Tarboro North Carolina. The company provides expertise in all phases of archaeological investigations, geospatial analysis, laboratory studies, and above-ground research. CCRG focuses on pipeline, transportation, and other linear corridor projects. Don Weir has been the major author of over 100 technical reports as well as articles and papers at regional and national professional meetings. He has served on the Board and as Treasurer of the American Cultural Resources Association. He was the Treasurer of the Society for American Archaeology and served on the Board of the Society for Historical Archaeology. View Guest page

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Jacqui Wood

Jacqui Wood is an archaeologist and a director of Saveock Water Archaeology in Cornwall, Britain, where she also runs an archaeological field school. She has been researching the practical aspects of daily life in prehistoric Europe for the past 30 years. She regularly appears on various archaeological TV programs. Most recently she participated on a Time Team special program on the Mesolithic period, which is scheduled to be broadcasted in the New Year. Dr. Wood wrote an article in “Archaeology Experiences Spirituality” about the Witchcraft pits from the proceedings of the World Archaeology Conference. She has also published two books about prehistoric foods “Prehistoric Cooking” and “Tasting the Past: Recipes from the Stone Age to the Present.” Dr. Wood was on the National Education Committee of the Council for British Archaeology. View Guest page

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Dr. Rita Wright

Dr. Rita Wright is an anthropological archaeologist and a professor of anthropology at New York University. She received her B.A. at Wellesley College (1975), her M.A and PhD at Harvard University (1978 and 1984, respectively). She conducted her field research in South Asia and the Near East examining urbanism, state formation, gender relations, exchange networks and cultural heritage. Dr. Wright participated in excavations in Iran at Tal-l Malyan, ancient Anshan, Mehrgarh in Baluchistan, Pakistan, and the city of Harappa in Pakistan. She also conducts a survey of the northern areas of Afghanistan to identify archaeological sites involved in the trade of lapis lazuli and more recently copper and tin. Dr. Wright also examines secondary Mesopotamian sources for studies of gender relations and division of labor in the ancient past, and the significance of widespread contacts in developmental histories. View Guest page

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Rebecca Yamin

Rebecca Yamin is a historical archaeologist specializing in urban archaeology. She began her work with the Federal Courthouse site in Lower Manhattan that was once part of the notorious Five Points neighborhood. She has also excavated and analyzed sites in New York, New Jersey, and West Virginia, as well as many sites in Philadelphia as the director of John Milner Associates’ branch office. In addition to her work at John Milner Associates, Dr. Yamin has worked in the academic, museum, and CRM spheres. She is a member of a group of archaeologists who use narrative approaches to interpreting archaeological results, an approach she first developed for the Five Points report. She is the co-editor of Landscape Archaeology, Reading and Interpreting the American Historical Landscape and the author of Digging in the City of Brotherly Love, Stories from Philadelphia Archaeology. She has also published and lectured widely on the Five Points project. Dr Yamin now works as an independent consultant and is writing a book on the archaeology of prostitution. She holds a BA degree in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania and MA and Ph.D. degrees from New York University. View Guest page

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Marc Zender

Marc Zender received his PhD in archaeology from the University of Calgary in 2004. He has taught at the University of Calgary (2002-2004) and Harvard University (2005-2011), and is presently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University, New Orleans, where he has taught archaeology, epigraphy (the study of ancient inscriptions), and linguistics since September 2011. His research interests include anthropological and historical linguistics, comparative writing systems (grammatology), and archaeological decipherment, with a regional focus on Mesoamerica (particularly Mayan and Nahuatl/Aztec). He is the author of several books and dozens of articles touching on these themes, and has collaborated as a hieroglyphic specialist with numerous archaeological projects in Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. In addition to his research and writing, Marc is associate editor of The PARI Journal, and (with Joel Skidmore) co-maintainer of Mesoweb.com, a major internet resource for the study of Ancient Mesoamerican cultures. View Guest page

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“And They Also Made Boats…” Maritime Archaeology in Pharaonic Egypt”

January 16, 2013
Hosted by Dr. Joseph Schuldenrein

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Episode Description

While the contributions of the ancient Egyptians to Western Civilization are familiar to the general public, this brilliant culture's seafaring technology is little known. Recent investigations have revealed that a sophisticated and efficient shipbuilding industry thrived in Pharaonic Egypt. River and seafaring vessels were locally and regionally built that facilitated commerce and transportation along the Nile and beyond. This episode examines how terrestrial and maritime archaeology enables researchers to reconstruct the ancient technology of Egyptian shipbuilding. Maritime archaeologist Cheryl Ward (Coastal Carolina University) and Egyptologist Kathryn Bard (Boston University) together with a team of experts have successfully reproduced and sea-tested an ancient Egyptian vessel on the Red Sea. They discuss the implications of their findings, which expand the reach of Egyptian civilization in the Mediterranean Basin and elsewhere.

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Indiana Jones: Myth, Reality and 21st Century Archaeology

Wednesday at 3 PM Pacific Time on VoiceAmerica Variety Channel

This show targets an audience interested in archaeology. It explores myths surrounding this exotic, often misunderstood field and acquaints listeners with the contemporary practice of unearthing the human past. Themes range from Dr. Schuldenrein’s own “Indiana Jones”-like adventures in the land of the Bible to his team’s archaeological forensics effort to unearth Kurdish mass graves in Iraq. That undertaking helped convict Saddam Hussein in 2006. Topical issues contribute to the evolution vs. creationism controversy based on updated fossil records and innovative DNA studies. An episode highlights the main funding source for archaeology in the U.S. (Hint: the oil and gas industry). Experts reveal the latest high-tech approaches to buried archaeological landscapes that provide clues to understanding climate change, past, present and future. Indiana Jones: Myth, Reality and 21st Century Archaeology is broadcast live every Wednesday at 3 PM Pacific Time on the VoiceAmerica Variety Channel

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Dr. Joseph Schuldenrein

Joseph Schuldenrein is president and senior scientist of Geoarcheology Research Associates (GRA) in Yonkers, New York. He has been a Visiting Scholar at New York University since 1996. His professional expertise is in geoarchaeology, a sub-discipline that introduces earth science techniques to traditional archaeological excavation. Joe has worked extensively across North America and the Old World. He received his doctorate in 1983 at the University of Chicago. Recent research in North America has concentrated on the urban archaeology of New York City and Native American landscapes of the Atlantic Coast. Joe’s projects in South Asia have ranged from Human Origins investigations to the beginnings of civilization of the Indus Valley. During the Iraq war Dr. Schuldenrein’s team helped direct a forensic archaeological mission in support of the Saddam Hussein prosecution. His newest venture is an assessment of Cultural Heritage Sites in war-torn Afghanistan (2011). Dr. Schuldenrein publishes widely in numerous archaeological and geological journals. He is a reviewer for American Antiquity, Geoarchaeology, and Quaternary Science Reviews. He has acted as Principal Investigator or Consulting Scientist for grants awarded by the National Science Foundation, Wenner-Gren, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute for Aegean Prehistory. Dr. Schuldenrein has been interviewed for PBS, as well as national and regional TV and radio outlets over the past 30 years.

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