Chris Martenson

Chris Martenson

Chris Martenson may know more about "The Three E’s" (economy, energy and environment) than just about anybody else. Once a vice-president of an international Fortune 300 company, he lived in a waterfront, 5-bathroom house in upscale Mystic, CT. His large portfolio was managed by a broker -- and his neighbors? He barely knew them. He was, in other words, definitely part of the 1%. Now, the dynamic, articulate and entertaining Martenson is regularly invited to speak at the United Nations, major corporations, municipalities, the U.K. House of Parliament and various U.S. state legislatures – but not because his message is one the 1% want to hear. In fact, it’s just the opposite. Martenson ditched his corporate job in 2004, sold the McMansion and settled into a rural Massachusetts’ community, where he and his family now raise chickens and grow some of their own food. Meanwhile, the Ph.D. scientist devoted himself to dissecting and explaining “The Three E’s” in a way which helps the 99% understand what is going on. His website traffic is now in the top 1% of all internet sites. His video lecture series, The Crash Course, has been translated into 6 languages and watched over 5 million times. "For the first time ever," says Martenson, "the human experiment is seriously bumping up against the constraints of a finite planet. Declines in global supplies of energy and key non-renewable natural resources – the essential inputs for economic growth – are already upon us, with more rapidly approaching. Unfortunately, the leaders of our fragile, debt-based global economic system are addicted to pushing ‘growth’ as the answer to all our ills -- and that is just not going to work." As America prepares for a presidential campaign sure to be full of empty promises of "renewed economic growth" and outrage over the price of gas at the pump, Chris speaks with both realism and optimism about the future. "Unless we consciously manage our natural resources and business relationships to give priority to the common good, we will face dire consequences. Because I am not saying the economy won’t grow…I’m saying it can’t grow. Either we change on our own terms, or some other terms. Time still remains to navigate to a pleasant future filled with promise and purpose, but that time is running out."