Kelsa Dickey

Kelsa Dickey


When I was young, my mother filed bankruptcy. I remember the look on her face, how stressful that was for her, and how it affected her self-worth. She had a good job, worked hard, but she struggled to manage everything that was coming in and out. As a kid, I didn’t know what “bankruptcy” meant, but I learned that money impacts our life- whether we want it to or not, whether that’s in a good way, or a bad way, it’s going to have an impact. When I was a senior in high school, a college recruiter came to my school and asked me what I wanted to do with my life. I replied, “I want to help people with their money.” To which he replied, “You should become a financial advisor!” So I went to school and received a Bachelor’s degree in Finance, earned the appropriate licenses to practice as a financial advisor (Series 7 and 66 and Health, Life and Disability) then did so for 3 years.