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Moir’s Environmental Dialogues

Moir’s Environmental Dialogues

Thursdays at 12 Noon Pacific

March 09th 2017:Saving the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

Rolf Olson, Refuge Manager, Mark Musaus, former Refuge Manager, and Elinor Williams, president, Friends talk with Rob. The Loxahatchee is an awesome threshold brimming with wildlife between Lake Okeechobee, agricultural lands, and pine flatwoods to the north and the Everglades to the south, partially bounded by the largest remaining remnant of a cypress strand. An invasive plant, Old World climbing fern, is smothering about 72% of the Refuge. This tenacious vine with 100-foot-long tendrils kills plants by either blocking out light or by causing trees and other native plants to collapse un

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Featured Guests

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Rolf Olson

Rolf Olson is Refuge Manager of the Loxahatchee NWR, Palm Beach County, FL. Collaborative management with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service working in partnership with the South Florida Water Management District has failed to eradicate the invasive climbing fern. The federal agency spends $2 million a year, with the state spending approximately the same amount in recent years. This is woefully inadequate. Water quality and the quantity of water flowing into the Everglades are issues no less pressing than is the spread of invasive plants. There is still work to be done by concerned advocates to save the Loxahatchee. Home of the endangered Everglades Snail Kite, Wood Storks, Mott
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Mark Musaus

Mark Musaus is former Refuge Manager of the Loxahatchee NWR. An invasive plant, Old World climbing fern, is smothering about 72% of the Refuge. This tenacious vine with 100-foot-long tendrils kills plants by either blocking out light or by causing trees and other native plants to collapse under the weight. Because aerial spraying kills all plants, the climbing fern stems must be hand-cut. Then the lower portions are sprayed. Crews, brought to each island by air boat, often stand in nearly waist high water. Climbing ferns are remarkably quick to release spores and propagate. So quick that the crew must return to the site for the next two years to fully eradicate the ferns. Five
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Elinor Williams

Elinor Williams currently serves as president of Friends of the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Palm Beach County, Florida.
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https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/1570/moirs-environmental-dialogues 23/11/2017 12:00 23/11/2017 01:00 Moir’s Environmental Dialogues https://www.voiceamerica.com/show/1570/moirs-environmental-dialogues Rolf Olson, Refuge Manager, Mark Musaus, former Refuge Manager, and Elinor Williams, president, Friends talk with Rob. The Loxahatchee is an awesome threshold brimming with wildlife between Lake Okeechobee, agricultural lands, and pine flatwoods to the north and the Everglades to the south, partially bounded by the largest remaining remnant of a cypress strand. An invasive plant, Old World climbing fern, is smothering about 72% of the Refuge. This tenacious vine with 100-foot-long tendrils kills plants by either blocking out light or by causing trees and other native plants to collapse under the weight. Because aerial spraying kills all plants, the climbing fern stems must be hand-cut. Then the lower portions are sprayed. Crews, brought to each island by air boat, often stand in nearly waist high water. The Refuge is known for having the greatest number of alligators in America, not the greatest biomass of alligators, just the greatest number of snapping jaws per foot. Snakes,too VoiceAmerica | Talk Radio | Online Talk Radio studio@voiceamerica.com false DD/MM/YYYY Add to Calendar
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