Advertisement

Episode Directory

October 2013

  • 10/14/2013: The Last War - Racism and Spirituality? Listen Now
  • 10/7/2013: He Just Won’t Quit! Who is Dr. Clarence Jones Really? Listen Now

September 2013

August 2013

July 2013

June 2013

May 2013

December 2012

November 2012

October 2012

September 2012

August 2012

July 2012

June 2012

Charles Alawan, Hajj

Mr. Charles Alawan, Hajj, is one of the founders of the largest Arab-American religious and cultural facilities in North America located in Metro Detroit (Dearborn), Michigan. Born in Detroit, Chuck had the privilege of being raised in a multicultural environment. Mr. Alawan’s father, Hajj Ibraham, was from Damascus, Syria, and his mother, Hajjah Katie Ankouny, was from Michigan City, Indiana of Lebanese and French Canadian decent. Mr. Alawan has received numerous awards including the Islamic Merit Award, Boy Scouts of America, National Committee for Community and Justice (NCCJ), State of Michigan “Minuteman” Governor’s Award for Meritorious Service to the Community, and The Martin Luther King, Jr. “Keep the Dream Alive” for Interfaith and Race Relations Work. Chuck retired from consulting, Vice President of Sales, and as a Muslim Chaplain for the Detroit Area Council. Mr. Alawan attended Wayne State University and studied at the American University of Beirut. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Barbara R. Arnwine

Barbara R. Arnwine, Executive Director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, is internationally renowned for justice issues such as the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1991 and international civil, human and women’s rights matters. She is a graduate of Duke University School of Law. The Lawyers’ Committee monitors USA treaty compliance on International Covenants on Civil, Political Rights, and Conventions on elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination with the United Nations. Ms. Arnwine is a prominent leader of Election Protection, the nation’s largest nonpartisan voter protection coalition. Extensive awards include Gruber International Justice Prize on civil rights and gender equity, National Bar Association Gertrude E. Rush, Freedom’s Sisters Award Ford Motor Company. She is a featured columnist on Trice Edney News Wire and Theodore and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute. Board Memberships include National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and Equal Justice Works. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Frank Bailey, Ph.D.

History Professor Frank Bailey, Ph.D. has taught at Chaminade University for 12 year. His specialty is Hawaiian history. Dr. Bailey is passionate about recognizing, preserving, and ensuring that educators, Hawaiians, and mainlanders are aware of the Hawaiian Kingdom of the past and present impacts on Native Hawaiians. Dr. Bailey, a Native Hawaiian with the given name of Kama`ipi`iali`i, lives his work. Frank, with the help of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, launched a traveling Hawaiian History Exhibit that tell the true story of a people once colonized and forbidden to speak their language, the remarkable renaissance, and disparities that linger today. Another important part of his work involves a State Department of Education grant on teaching teachers how to teach American history. He is a guest speaker for various companies on the Hawaiian monarchs. Professor Bailey wants to continue and expand his teaching to a modern military history class focusing on the evolution of warfare. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Dr. Jeanette Betancourt

Dr. Jeanette Betancourt is Senior VP Outreach and Educational Practices at Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization of Sesame Street. Responsibilities include strategic branding and delivery of domestic and international outreach bilingual initiatives. Sesame Street’s Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration, is for families with children ages 3-8 who have an incarcerated parent and need more resilience skills. This resource is distributed through targeted outlets. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Juanita Brown

Juanita Brown, Principal of Juanita Capri Brown & Associates, specializes in racial equity and healing. She engages institutions in breakthrough conversations and restorative systems, and facilitates with Glasswing Institute for Racial Healing at Starr Commonwealth. She co-produced Emmy-nominated PBS documentary Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, and graduated from Stanford and the University of California at Berkeley. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Katrina Browne

Katrina Browne, Founder of The Tracing Center on Histories and Legacies of Slavery, and produced/directed Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, about her slave-trading ancestors from Rhode Island. It took nine years, and 500 parties to make this film and dialogue groups. The film contributed to the Episcopal Church atoning for its role in slavery. Traces of the Trade premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, and aired on PBS reaching over 1.5 million people. An Emmy nomination and honors from the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society among others followed. Katrina co-founded Public Allies in twenty cities to recruit young people of all backgrounds to engage in public service. She has an M.A. in theology from Pacific School of Religion. Katrina is a speaker, trainer and facilitator on the interplay of history, memory, identity and the politics of race. Her passion is to connect emotions, structural racism and how to untangle it all. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Dr. Gail C. Christopher, D.N.

Dr. Gail Christopher is vice president for program strategy at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in Battle Creek, Michigan. She serves on the executive team that provides overall direction and leadership for the Foundation. Gail is a nationally recognized leader in health policy, and has more than 20 years experience in national initiatives and nonprofit organizations. She is nationally recognized for her pioneering work to infuse holistic health and diversity concepts into public sector programs and policy discourse. Honors include elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and Leadership Award Health Brain Trust of the Congressional Black Caucus. Gail is the author or co-author of three books, writes a monthly column in the Federal Times and quoted in The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Dallas, Times, National Journal, Essence, and has appeared on “Good Morning America,” “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” National Public Radio, PBS and CBS documentaries. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

James P. Comer, MD

James P. Comer, M.D. is the Maurice Falk Professor of Child Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine’s Child Study Center in New Haven, Connecticut. He is known globally for his creation of the Comer School Development Program; the forerunner of most modern school reform efforts. He is the author of ten books, including most recently, “What I Learned in School: Reflections on Race, Child Development, and School Reform”. His school restructuring work is featured in numerous sources and academic journals. He is co-founder of the Black Psychiatrists of America. He was a consultant to Children's Television Workshop. Dr. Comer’s many awards include the John & Mary Markle Scholar in Academic Medicine Award, Rockefeller Public Service Award, Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Prize in Education, Heinz Award for the Human Condition, and the John Hope Franklin Award. He has forty-seven honorary degrees and membership in the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

James M. Croteau

James M. Croteau, Ph.D. Southern Illinois University is Professor at Western Michigan University, Department of Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology. He is a fellow of both the Society of Counseling Psychology and Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Issues of the American Psychological Association (APA). His practice and scholarship includes lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) issues, race in White Americans, and intersections in race and sexual orientation among White LGB people. Jim edited over 45 articles and books, including The Handbook of Counseling Psychology and the Biennial Review of Counseling Psychology. He serves on the Journal of Counseling and Development board. He received the Outstanding Achievement Award from APA’s Committee on Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns, edited/authored Deconstructing Heterosexism in the Counseling Professions: A Narrative Approach, and writes on race and sexual orientation in multicultural counseling. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Valerie Davidson

Valerie Davidson, tribal member of the Orutsararmuit Native Council, is Senior Director of Legal and Intergovernmental Affairs for the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, a statewide tribal health organization based in Anchorage, Alaska. Val has been spokesperson, chief political and legal strategist for ANTHC’s Dental Health Aide Therapy Program, a member of the National Steering Committee for Reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, and a member of the National Title V Negotiated Rulemaking Committee of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act. She served as Co-Lead Negotiator for Alaska’s 229 federally recognized tribes to negotiate the Alaska Tribal Health Compact for health services for Alaska Natives and American Indians in Alaska, and serves on the Alaska Health Care Commission established by Governor Parnell for a statewide health plan for Alaska. Most importantly, Val enjoys spending time with her niece, nephew, and two daughters. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Sharon Davis

Sharon was the former Executive Director for the National Resource Center for Racial Healing. She has over 25 years experience in Information Technology. Her unique blend of “high tech/high touch” is a key to culture change. Today, in addition to business and executive coaching duties at SeDA Consulting, she hosts the syndicated radio show “A Safe Place to Talk about Race”. She was a Project Advisor –Diversity for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Saturn Titan Mission, co-facilitated Healing Racism and Tribalism in the US, South Africa, Botswana, and conflict resolution in China. She Chaired the International Institute and served the U.S Immigration Services as speaker and MC at Swearing-in Ceremonies for new citizens. Sharon earned a B.S. from Michigan State University in Math/Science, Sub-Saharan African Culture, Psychology, and Political Science. Honors include Houston (Texas) Peace Award for Inter-group Understanding, and in 2012 awarded Western Michigan University’s Excellence in Diversity. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Thomas DeWolf

Thomas Norman DeWolf is the author of Inheriting the Trade: A Northern Family Confronts Its Legacy as the Largest Slave-Trading Dynasty in U.S. History. He wrote about traveling with nine distant relatives on a life-altering journey through Rhode Island, Ghana, and Cuba to film the Emmy-nominated documentary Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, in which he is featured. An Official Selection of the Sundance Film Festival, the film premiered on national television on the acclaimed PBS series P.O.V. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Eric Dozier

Eric Dozier is the former musical director for the World Famous Harlem Gospel Choir and the co-founder and Director of Arts and Education for One Human Family Music Workshops, Inc., an organization devoted to eradicating discrimination by ‘Uniting the World..One Song at a Time.' As a social entrepreneur and cultural activist, Eric has been assisting communities in developing inspiring contexts from which to launch campaigns of dynamic service to humanity for the last twenty years. Through his insightful lyrics and soulful melodies, interactive workshops and lectures, Eric continues to embody his commitment to spirited, informed, and creative conversation around the divisive issues that threaten undermine the fellowship of the human family. He is a graduate of Duke University with a B.A. in Public Policy Studies and holds Masters in Theological Studies from Duke Divinity School. He is also recently married, has two beautiful daughters and resides in Nashville, TN. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Tod M. Ewing

Tod has over 25 years of experience as a national/international trainer and speaker in diversity and race relations. He works extensively in the public and private sector. His presentations are predicated on the belief that humanity is one and human beings have innate nobility for good. Tod’s most recent book “Seeing Heaven in the Face of Black Men” www.heaveninthefaceofblackmen.com is a candid personal journey, examining the emotional/psychological landmines created by racism. As have some of the most effective human and civil rights leaders of the past, he grounds solutions in the “practicality of spirituality.” Tod is co-founder of an NAACP chapter, served as trainer for the National Multicultural Institute. and co-chair of the Advisory Board for Social Justice at the YWCA in Washington, D.C. He is on the Advisory Board for the Authenticity Institute, and a contributing writer for Science of Mind magazine. Tod holds a master’s degree in Spiritual Psychology. (M.Div.) View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Juan Flores

Juan Flores is Professor of Latino Studies, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. His research focus is social and cultural theory, Latino and Puerto Rican studies, popular music, theory of diaspora and transnational communities, Afro-Latino culture. Books include Divided Borders: Essays on Puerto Rican Identity, From Bomba to Hip-Hop: Puerto Rican Culture and Latino Identity, and The Diaspora Strikes Back: Caribeño Tales of Learning and Turning. Juan was twice awarded the Casa de las Americas Prize, and the Latino Legacy award of the Smithsonian Institution. They co-edited The Afro-Latino Reader: History and Culture in the United States, a 2011 American Book Award. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Albino Garcia

Chicano/Native activist Albino Garcia founded the grassroots organization La Plazita Institute located in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2004. He is a Kellogg Fellow and Ceremonial Chief in the Lakota tradition. Mr. Garcia is of Apache and Chichimeca heritage. He grew up in Chicago and is no stranger to the streets; his background closely mirrors that of the populations that La Plazita Institute serves. He has done extensive healing work with youth, veterans, and gang members. His leadership style is grounded in traditional culture, and he is known and respected for approaching challenging situations with creativity, honesty, inclusiveness, and innovation. His accomplishments include establishing the award winning New School in Watsonville, California, which provided a successful educational context for gang affiliated youth. Albino describes his passion as “more like a spiritual mission: to make life more manageable for people.” View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Paula Giddings

Paula Giddings is the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor, Afro-American Studies, Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, editor of Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism, a peer-review journal by Smith College and published by University of Indiana Press. She authored four books: When and Where I Enter: The Impact on Black Women on Race and Sex in America; In Search of Sisterhood, Delta Sigma Theta and the Challenge of the Black Sorority Movement; Burning All Illusions, (editor) an anthology on race published by the Nation magazine; and Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography and deemed one of the best books of 2008 by the Washington Post and the Chicago Tribune. Ms. Giddings is a former book editor and journalist for international and national issues and published by the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jeune Afrique (Paris), and The Nation among others View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Phillip Atiba Goff

Phillip Atiba Goff (Ph.D., Stanford University) is Assistant Professor of Social Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles and Executive Director of Research for the Consortium for Police Leadership in Equity (CPLE). He examines racial discrimination and intersections. Dr. Goff forged the first national research/action network of police executives, communities, advocates, and researchers for social justice. The CPLE counts 75 plus researchers and major cities who provide the data, policy changes and accountability. He is known for work exploring Racism without Racists, and unjust outcomes absent race hostility. This research is recognized by the National Institute of Mental Health, and many others. He is the first to link psychological factors of an officer’s past use of force to the first empirical model for predicting police violence, and race bias in police brutality. Dr. Goff is a recognized leader in contemporary theories, and an expert witness on national cases. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Jorge Gonzalez

Jorge Gonzalez is the Director of Economic Development at LINC. He currently serves on various non-profit boards including President Emeritus of the West Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. He graduated from Grand Valley State University, and enjoys spending time with his family, the community, and running whenever possible! View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Dr. Kirk E. Harris

Dr. Kirk E. Harris, professor at the School of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, served on Sen. Obama’s Metropolitan and Urban Policy Committee, served as national facilitator for National Fatherhood Leaders Group, testified before Congress, and co-leads Fathers, Families and Healthy Communities in Chicago. He earned a law degree at Thomas Jefferson Law School, a Ph.D. from Cornell University, and is a member of the Georgia, Washington, DC and US Supreme Court Bars. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Deepa Iyer

Deepa Iyer is the Executive Director of South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), a national, non-profit organization in the Washington, DC area. She has guided SAALT’s direction on policy advocacy, programs and partnerships since 2004. Ms. Iyer is also the Chair of the National Council of Asian Pacific Americans. An attorney by training, Ms. Iyer has previously worked at Asian American legal organizations as well as the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, where she litigated immigration-related unfair employment practices and addressed the post September 11th backlash facing South Asian, Muslim, Sikh and Arab American communities. Regarded as an expert on the impact of September 11th on immigrants and minority communities, Ms. Iyer is the Executive Producer of a documentary on hate crimes, has written extensively on the post 9/11 backlash, and taught classes at Columbia University, Hunter College and the University of Maryland. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Allan G. Johnson

Allan G. Johnson is a public speaker, sociologist, nonfiction writer, and novelist who devotes his life to understanding the human condition, especially systems of privilege based on gender, race, and social class. Allan’s social justice work focuses on what we can do to understand and change our shared legacy of life organized around oppressive systems privilege, power, and difference. Unraveling the knot of privilege begins with getting clear about what privilege really is, what it’s got to do with each of us, and about how everyone can see themselves as part of the process of change toward something better. In his book Privilege, Power, and Difference, Allan Johnson teaches us how to think critically about inequality and oppression without getting mired in guilt or despair. Then he shows us how to walk the talk and turn our beliefs in justice and equality into practice. Oprah Winfrey’s O Magazine named his first novel The First Thing and the Last one of its “Great Reads” for April 2010. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Dr. Clarence B. Jones

His service to Martin Luther King, Jr. includes helping to draft the famous “I Have a Dream” speech. Born in 1931, Dr. Clarence B. Jones spent time in a foster home. He graduated from Columbia University, after being discharged from the military for refusing to sign a declaration that he had no ties to Communism. Jones later became a lawyer on King’s legal team and was his draft speechwriter. A trusted advisor of King's, Jones delivered the famed "Letter from Birmingham Jail" to the clergy in Birmingham in 1963. He acted as a negotiator during the Attica Prison Riots in 1971 at the request of Gov. Rockefeller and the inmates. He is an undeniably capable businessman, respected professor, activist, and author. He has received multiple awards, was the 1st African-American Allied member of the NYSE, co-wrote “Behind the Dream The Making of the Speech that Transformed a Nation”, and teaches the course “From Slavery to Obama” as visiting professor at the University of San Francisco. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Jamal Joseph

Professor Joseph credits his time in the Black Panther Party and nine years in State and Federal Prisons as the fire that forged his creative sword. He is a full professor, former Chair Columbia University’s Graduate Film Division, with films featured on FOX, A & E, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, PBS and Starz. He authored “Tupac:Legacy” and his own memoir “Panther Baby”. Professor Joseph was named a top twelve African American New York Educators, honored by the N.A.A.C.P., One Hundred Black Women and National Black Theater. Other awards include Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, Union Square Award, and an Oscar nomination for co-writing the song “Raise it Up” for the film “August Rush”. He has been featured on ABC’s Nightline, ESPN’s “One Night in Vegas” BET’s “American Gangster”, VH1’s “Lords of the Revolution” and HBO. He is affectionately known as “Uncle Jamal” by hundreds he has mentored and is most proud of Co-Founding and Executive Artistic Director of Impact Repertory Theater. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Phoebe Kilby

Phoebe Kilby began her work in racial reconciliation in 2007, when she first contacted Betty Kilby Baldwin on Martin Luther King Day. Phoebe’s ancestors were slaveholders; Betty is descended from the slaves that Phoebe’s family once held. Phoebe and Betty have since become leaders in Coming to the Table, which seeks to fulfill Dr. King’s dream that “the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.” Dr. Betty Kilby Baldwin began her journey as a plaintiff in the case of Betty Kilby, et al., vs. Warren County Board of Education to open up the local high school to African Americans. Her journey is documented in her book Wit, Will & Walls. Her passion is that all mankind can live, work and play together in love, peace and harmony. Phoebe and Betty lead workshops and dialogues on racial reconciliation across the United States. They hope to assist others interested in improving race relations in their communities. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Angela King

Growing up in South Florida, Angela King became confused about sexual and racial messages from her church and family. She began acting out and felt welcomed for the first time by racist skinheads: "They were angry and hated everyone. I felt like part of a family." Entrenched, crime became important. The Oklahoma City bombing made Angela reconsider her beliefs, although Skinhead affiliates would retaliate. Angela was sentenced to 6-years in prison for armed robbery of a Jewish-owned store. Released from prison 3 years early for good behavior, she graduated from the University of Central Florida. Angela is a keynote speaker, consultant, correspondent, and educator. Awards include Prejudice Reduction and Holocaust education. Angela was a panelist at the 2011 Google Summit Against Violent Extremism, in Dublin, Ireland, a panelist at a 9/11 commemoration on Terrorism in Washington DC, a correspondent and character educator for LifeafterHate.org, and is currently writing a memoir. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Morris King Jr.

Morris King Jr. is a rare Black world class professional tennis coach and former advisory coach of Venus and Serena Williams through their father, Richard Williams, during their early pro careers (historic news articles ( www.bit.ly/wms-art1) and ( www.bit.ly/wms-art2 )), having assisted Mr. Williams with Venus' rise to the WTA Tour's Top 10 and with Serena's unprecedented record 7 month rise in the WTA's rankings from the 500s to 30. The rest is history. Additionally, Coach King coached Bosnian refugee Amer Delic into the stellar junior player that played in the prestigious Orange Bowl International Jr. Championships' 16s draw when he was only 14; a draw that had now-former ATP Tour pro star Marat Safin as the #2 seed and a draw that longtime ATP Tour #1 ranked Roger Federer wasn't good enough to make. Delic went on to become an NCAA national single's champion and an ATP touring pro. Official website: www.magian10S.com Follow on Twitter: @magiantennis View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Len Lamensdorf

Len Lamensdorf, Author and Playwright Mr. Lamensdorf is an award-winning author of eight novels including ‘The Ballad of Billy Lee, The Story of George Washington’s Favorite Slave’, three full-length plays, and the motion picture, ‘Cornbread, Earl and Me’. A three-time Silberman Memorial Scholar and an honors graduate of the University of Chicago, Len studied playwriting at UCLA with Theatre Arts Department Chairman Kenneth Macgowan, founder of the world-famous Provincetown Players and the original producer of the plays of Eugene O’Neill. Lamensdorf also received his J.D. degree from the University of Chicago Law School, and completed his post-graduate work at Harvard Law School. Acclaimed by Pulitzer Prize winners Joseph J. Ellis and Ron Chernow for his "(work that is) Rooted firmly in the historical record”, and “beautiful job of coaxing [Billy Lee] out into the sunlight”, Len continues working and lives in California with his wife. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Mitch Landrieu

Mitch Landrieu was sworn in as the 61st mayor of New Orleans on May 3, 2010. He has pledged to usher in a new era of peace and prosperity for the people of New Orleans. As a state legislator, Major Landrieu represented the Broadmoor neighborhood for 16 years. As Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, he served as an executive, managing a $127 million budget and 800 employees. After Hurricane Katrina, he led the effort to rebuild the tourism industry and the thousands of jobs it creates. His team got more than $22 million in grant money from Congress into the hands of hundreds of homeowners quickly. During his tenure, Mayor Landrieu focused on creating jobs. He launched the Cultural Economy initiative to grow jobs through our culture, music, food, film and art. The cultural economy accounts for 144,000 jobs in our state. Mayor Landrieu has worked aggressively to restore public confidence and credibility in our city, our government, and our police department. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Michael McCullough

Mac leads a newsroom committed to the idea that excellent community journalism fosters positive systemic change for the benefit of all citizens. Mac received his journalism degree from West Virginia University and held several reporting and editing positions before settling in Battle Creek. He was a Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation fellow and attended the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education’s Management Training at Northwestern University. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Dr. Kay McGowan

Dr. Kay McGowan is of Mississippi Choctaw and Cherokee heritage. She is a Cultural Anthropologist with degrees from University of Michigan, and PhD from Wayne State University. She teaches Anthropology and Native American Studies at Eastern Michigan University. Kay co-founded First Step, an organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. As Director with the Michigan Citizens Lobby, Kay helped pass the first Generic Drug Law in the US. She was a consultant at the Rosa Parks Foundation’s Pathway to Freedom Program on the Trail of Tears. She is the author of over sixty articles and has contributed to several books. She serves on the board of the National Urban Indian Coalition and the National Indian Youth Council. Dr. McGowan is a regular delegate to the United Nations including the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the Committee to Eliminate Racial Discrimination. Dr. McGowan was inducted in the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Gregory Moore

Greg is the editor of the Denver Post. He has run the paper since coming to Denver in June 2002. He joined The Post after 16 years at The Boston Globe, the last eight as managing editor. He is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and worked in Dayton Ohio and his hometown of Cleveland before working in Boston. He has been a member of the board of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, served on the board of trustees at his alma mater and currently is serving his ninth year on the Pulitzer Prize Board, serving as co-chair. The Post won the 2012 Pulitzer for Feature Photography, the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography, for a total of 8 Pulitzers and the first since Columbine in 2000. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Sharon Morgan

Sharon Leslie Morgan is the founder of OurBlackAncestry.com, a website devoted to helping people appreciate and explore African American family history and culture. Sharon’s first book, My Daddy Is A Cool Dude, was published in 1975 by The Dial Press and nominated for a prestigious Caldecott Medal for children’s literature. She is also the co-author of Real Women Cook: Building Healthy Communities With Recipes that Stir the Soul. Sharon is a marketing communications consultant. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Vivian Nixon

Vivian Nixon is Executive Director of College and Community Fellowship, which is committed to removing barriers to higher education for women and families with criminal records. She is also co-founder of the Education from the Inside Out Coalition, a group committed to increase access to education for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people at every level. Multiple honors include the John Jay Medal for Justice. Rev. Nixon holds a BS from the State University of New York Empire College. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Alex Nogales

Elected President of the NHMC in the late nineties, Alex tirelessly advocates for the Latino community. He led boycotts against advertisers of the “Howard Stern” radio show when Stern offended the Latino community and family of the late singing star, Selena Quintanilla-Perez. Under Nogales’ leadership, the NHMC filed over 50 petitions to deny FCC broadcast licenses, and one against a Spanish-language radio company for encouraging pornographic programming. Nogales led demonstrations against ABC and parent company, Disney, for lack of diversity and apparent exclusion of American Latinos from jobs. Alex was instrumental in the signing of a Memoranda of Understanding with NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox. Currently, Nogales is evaluating diversity performance of four major TV networks, and challenging media that demonize the Latino immigrant community to boost ratings. The NHMC is a leader against hate speech in media. Alex’s leadership has increased policies that impact the Latino community. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Randy Osmun

Randy Osmun, Executive Director of The SOURCE, a members-only nonprofit business collaborative that increases employee retention to impact families and communities. Randy is passionate about issues of hunger, race, equity, inclusion, employment and social justice. He graduated from Aquinas College, Michigan State University, and is a Ph.D student at Antioch University. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Fred Patrick

Fred Patrick directs Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education at the Vera Institute of Justice which assists selected states in demonstrating that postsecondary education, with supportive reentry services, can reduce recidivism, and increase employability. Previously, Fred served as Deputy Commissioner for Programs at the NYC Department of Correction, NYPD Deputy Commissioner for Community Affairs and taught at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He has degrees from Princeton University, MPA and Tuskegee University, BS. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Donna R. Payne

Donna R. Payne, Associate Director of Diversity, Human Rights Campaign (HRC), works with Civil Rights organizations, religious and People of Color communities, and leads the HRC’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Program. She received the Rosa Parks Award, is an African American lesbian activist, and member of the Metropolitan Community Church. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Mark Perry

Mark Perry earned a master’s degree in cultural anthropology and a doctorate in the history of culture from the University of Chicago. His bachelor’s degree from Haverford College is in physics and music. Originally from Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, where he grew up in an interracial family, he has lived 2 years in Africa and 12 years in the Middle East. His study of race issues led to a more fundamental question: how can human beings, high technology and nature converge in a sustainable, ever-evolving civilization? Convergence is the subject of his next book. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Plessy and Ferguson Foundation

All are founders of The Plessy and Ferguson Foundation and natives of New Orleans: Keith M. Plessy is a bellman at The Marriott hotel. He graduated from the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. A gifted artist, he has painted hundreds of civil rights portraits. Foundation president, Keith tirelessly reaches out to the community. Phoebe Ferguson, after graduating from NYU, returned home to make “Member of the Club”, a film about the rise of New Orleans' Black middle class. She works at the Foundation and shares the importance of documenting stories, the past, and legacy. Keith Weldon Medley is author of “We as Freemen – Plessy v. Ferguson”, and is a recipient of Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities’. His publications include Smithsonian magazine, The Times-Picayune, and Southern Exposure. Brenda Billips Square specializes in African American history, race relations, and is an archivist and librarian. She collects oral histories after Hurricane Katrina, and received a peace award. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Abraham Poston

Abraham Poston is a federal sector diversity and equal opportunity official with several years of leadership experience in the field.  Mr. Poston serves as a medical center Diversity, Inclusion and Equal Employment Opportunity Manager and as a base Director of Equal Opportunity in the Air National Guard.      Mr. Poston earned a Master of Social Work degree from Western Michigan University. He received training on racial and gender dynamics and their influence on mission performance at the Department of Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute.   Mr. Poston is a trained coach, mentor and mediator within the federal sector.  Throughout his career, Mr. Poston has provided hundreds of hours of training on diversity management, workplace dynamics and equal employment policy.    As a consultant, Mr. Poston provides services to organizations looking to improve outcomes through innovative workplace strategies or responding to workplace discrimination concerns.  Mr. Poston is also a life coach, helping individuals achieve personal and career goals, as well as, a mediator providing solution-focused facilitation in corporate and community settings. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

John A. Powell

Renowned social justice advocate john a. powell persuasively argues that we have not achieved a post-racial society and that there is much work to do to redeem the American promise of inclusive democracy. Culled from a decade of writing about social justice and spirituality, these meditations on race, identity, and social policy provide an outline for laying claim to our shared humanity and a way toward healing ourselves and securing our future. Racing to Justice challenges us to replace attitudes and institutions that promote and perpetuate social suffering with those that foster relationships and a way of being that transcends disconnection and separation. "powell sets forth a powerful argument that . . . until we expand our sense of self, we will be unable to create the racially egalitarian and democratic. . . A brilliantly original and provocative challenge to the current social order." —Michael Omi, author of Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s View Guest page

Episode Listing:

J.R. Reynolds

J.R. Reynolds is a writer, communications consultant and Director of the Calhoun Race Impact Alliance (CRIA). He is a former Billboard magazine editor and currently writes the weekly newspaper column and blog, Humans being, which creates connections - between people and across cultures - by exploring the things we share in common. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Miriam Jiménez Román

Miriam Jiménez Román is Executive Director of afrolatin@ forum, an educational resource center on Black Latin@s. A frequent speaker and consultant on African American and Latin@ issues, her essays on diasporic racial formations and inter-ethnic relations appear in scholarly and popular media. They co-edited The Afro-Latino Reader: History and Culture in the United States, a 2011 American Book Award. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Brian D. Smedley, Ph.D.

Brian D. Smedley is Vice President and Director of the Health Policy Institute of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, DC. Formerly, Smedley was Research Director and co-founder of The Opportunity Agenda, whose mission is to build the national will to expand opportunity for all. Dr. Smedley was also a Senior Program Officer of the Institute of Medicine and lead editor of the reports In the Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health Care Workforce and Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. He also served as a Congressional Science Fellow through the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His numerous awards and distinctions include the Congressional Black Caucus Congressional Leadership in Advocacy, Rainbow/PUSH coalition award as a “Health Trailblazer”, and the Congressional Black Caucus “Healthcare Hero” award. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Shirley K. Sneve

Shirley K. Sneve is the Executive Director of Native American Public Telecommunications, whose mission is to share Native stories with the world that represent the experiences, values, and cultures of American Indians and Alaska Natives. She moved to Nebraska from Amherst, MA, where she was director of Arts Extension Service, a national arts service organization, based at the University of Massachusetts. Shirley Sneve (Rosebud Sioux) has been with NAPT for eight years. She was a founder of Northern Plains Tribal Arts Show, the Oyate Trail cultural tourism byway, and the Alliance of Tribal Tourism Advocates. She started her career as a producer for South Dakota Public Broadcasting. She serves on the board of The Association of American Cultures and the Arts Extension Institute. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Rita Starr

Rita Starr has spent over thirty years analyzing prejudice and oppression from both a systems point of view and the need to address the necessary emotional healing of both the victim and perpetrator. Her programs are distinguished by their capacity to move beyond talking about racism to strengthening people’s capacity to work for substantive change, both personally and institutionally. A graduate of the University of Missouri, Starr founded Healing Our Nation in 1987. Her programs have received national recognition including the 'President’s Initiative on Race' established during the Clinton Administration as well as community organizations, businesses, and city governments such as the City of Little Rock, Arkansas. Facilitator manuals and PowerPoint presentations jump start new facilitators into action. Now her long awaited book, Understanding the Impact of Prejudice and Race, an insightful handbook for understanding racism, is available on her website: www.healingournation.com View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Cherry Steinwender

Mrs. Cherry Steinwender is one of the founding members of the first Healing Racism organizations in the world, which began in 1989. She serves as Executive Director of The Center for the Healing of Racism in Houston, Texas. She is the author of the book "Bread is A Simple Food, Teaching Children about Cultures". Mrs. Steinwender is increasingly called upon for information, consultation, and seminar bookings both nationally and internationally. Over the last fifteen years, she has worked with delegations of dignitaries from at least 50 countries which include Africa, South Asia, Europe, and Brazil. The Center serves as a resource for the guest visitors entering the country through the USA State Department seeking knowledge about the American brand of racism. Cherry has received numerous awards and honors for her steadfast work in dismantling racism. Her life is one of service and she tirelessly contributes in schools with the youngest of our youth to the oldest. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Lori L. Tharps

Lori L. Tharps is an assistant professor of journalism at Temple University. A graduate of Smith College and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, Tharps spent more than a decade as a magazine professional working on staff at both Vibe and Entertainment Weekly and freelancing for such publications as Essence, Vibe Vixen and Suede. Tharps' recent work can be seen in the Columbia Journalism Review, Grid Philadelphia, Ebony.com and Vogue Black. Tharps is also the author of two critically acclaimed nonfiction books, Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America (St. Martin's) and Kinky Gazpacho: Life, Love & Spain (Atria). Both The Washington Post and Salon.com declared Kinky Gazpacho one of the best books of 2008. Tharps is also the author of the novel, Substitute Me (Atria). In February 2014 St. Martin's Press will be releasing an updated version of Hair Story. Tharps lives in Philadelphia with her husband and three children. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Phyllis & Gene Unterschuetz

Phyllis and Gene Unterschuetz are authors, speakers and workshop facilitators who have spent the past 15 years living in an RV, doing field research on the dynamics of racial conditioning. They have presented for universities, civic organizations, and neighborhood groups around the country. Their book Longing: Stories of Racial Healing was published May 2010 and contains true stories about their personal journey of racial awareness. During their year-long book tour the Unterschuetzes made over 150 appearances in 22 states, including at the National Center for Race Amity, Carter Center, W. K. Kellogg Foundation Headquarters and 12th Annual White Privilege Conference. Phyllis and Gene are co-creators, together with partner Tod Ewing, of the Race Story ReWrite Project, whose mission is to create sustainable social change by elevating the public discourse on race and empowering individuals to access their authentic capacities to transform cross-racial relationships. RaceStoryRewrite.com View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Hugh Vasquez

Hugh Vasquez is a primary cast member in the award-winning film The Color of Fear and appeared with the rest of the cast on the Oprah Winfrey Show. Hugh joined the National Equity Project as a Senior Associate with responsibility for developing and expanding the leadership for equity work throughout the country. He was most recently the Executive Director of the San Francisco Education Fund, a non-profit working to bring educational equity to public schools. Hugh has worked with hundreds of organizations and thousands of individuals to address issues of race, gender, class and other social divisions and create environments where youths and adults from all cultures are honored, valued, and respected. He is a presenter with Speak Out, a national organization providing top speakers on social justice topics. Hugh has a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He resides in the San Francisco Bay area. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Peter Wade

Peter Wade is currently Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester in England. Since 1988, he has done several spells of fieldwork in Colombia, looking at the Black social movement and constitutional reform, and tracing the social history of Colombian popular music in the twentieth century and its connections with ideas about nation and race. More recently, he has been exploring the construction of nature, biology, genetics and culture in ideas about race. His publications include Blackness and Race Mixture (1993), Race and Ethnicity in Latin America (2nd edition, 2010), Music, Race and Nation: Música Tropical in Colombia (2000), Race, Nature and Culture: An Anthropological Perspective (Pluto Press, 2002), and Race and Sex in Latin America (2009). His current research focuses on issues of race and new genomic technologies. He is directing a project on “Race, genomics and mestizaje (mixture) in Latin America: a comparative approach”. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Michael R. Wenger

Michael R. Wenger of Mitchellville, MD, is Senior Fellow and Acting Vice President for Civic Engagement and Governance at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, DC and an adjunct faculty member at George Washington University. Prior to coming to the Joint Center in October, 1998, Mr. Wenger was Deputy Director for Outreach and Program Development for President Clinton’s Initiative on Race. From 1981 to 1997 he served as States' Washington Representative for the Appalachian Regional Commission, and from 1977 to 1981 he held key policy-making positions in the administration of then-WV Governor John D. Rockefeller IV. His memoir, My Black Family, My White Privilege: A White Man's Journey Through the Nation's Racial Minefield, was published in November, 2012. Mr. Wenger was born in New York City and educated at Queens College of the City University of New York, where he was a leader in the civil rights struggles of the early 1960s. He is married and has three grown children, four grandchildren, and a great grandchild. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Tim Wise

Tim Wise is among the most prominent anti-racist writers and educators in the United States, and “One of the most brilliant, articulate and courageous critics of white privilege in the nation,” states professor Michael Eric Dyson, of Georgetown University. One of “25 Visionaries Who are Changing Your World,” he has spoken in all states of the U.S., and lectured internationally on comparative, education, religion, and labor market racism. Wise is the author of six books, including the highly acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son. He received the 2001 British Diversity Award. Wise co-taught a Master’s level class on Racism in the U.S., was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute, and was Youth Coordinator of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism to defeat neo-Nazi political candidate, David Duke. He graduated from Tulane University in New Orleans. Wise, a regular contributor on CNN, was also featured on ABC’s 20/20. View Guest page

Episode Listing:

Dr. Evaon Wong-Kim

Dr. Wong-Kim is Chair and Professor of the Social Work Department at California State East Bay. She is also a licensed clinical social worker. Dr. Wong-Kim is the Principal Investigator of a project: Racial Healing among Former Foster Care Youth that focuses on racial equity within the foster care system. She is an advocate for minority and low-income breast cancer survivors and is a member of the Intercultural Cancer Council for improving mortality rates of underserved populations. She was a member of Minority Women’s Health Panel of Experts for the Office on Women’s Health. Dr. Wong-Kim conducted research and published papers related to health disparities, cancer survivorship with Asian immigrants, quality of life and health disparities affecting the Asian American immigrant and Pacific Islander population with cancer. Dr. Wong-Kim is a well-recognized advocate and researcher for minority and low-income cancer patients, especially the Asian immigrant and Pacific Islander population. View Guest page

Episode Listing:


Bookmark and Share

The Last War - Racism and Spirituality?

October 14, 2013
Hosted by Sharon E. Davis

[Download MP3] [itunes] [Bookmark Episode]

Guest Information


[View Guest Page >]

Episode Description

The Roman Empire did not colorize the person. Rome is arguably the roots of Western civilization. Slavery existed, but not with the racism we know of today. Any form of slavery is bad, but the world hadn’t seen anything yet until bestial slavery began in the15th century. Exactly what deadly mix of elements and circumstances spawned a new form of slavery that still haunts us today? It’s not just economics. How can we untangle this violent web….faster? Can Politics do it? Can the Legal System do it. How about Thriving Materialism? Religion alone hasn’t done it yet. Can researchers pinpoint the form of dehumanization before bestial slavery that led to hyper-racism? What were the drivers in Europe that rationalized a worse form of racism? Maybe we can connect the dots. Join Author and Professor Dr. Mark Perry with his brilliantly researched book, The Last War: Racism, Spirituality and the Future of Civilization with a view on what must happen to climb out of the racism ditch.

  • Snag
  • ecard
  • Bookmark and Share

A Safe Place to Talk About Race

Archives Available on VoiceAmerica Variety Channel

Everyday, racial tensions grow. More people want a life free from hate and disparities in education, healthcare, criminal justice, etc., but don’t know how to sort it out or where to go. We bring experts and notables to engage with you on real life and living in this journey. Learn insights and information you can use to help relieve the pain, shame, anxiety, pressure, and hear some of the best thoughts and views available today. We create a safe and loving environment to help heal the human heart from racial conditioning. It starts with our belief in the Oneness of Humankind. We erroneously learned our way into racism, and we will intentionally learn our way out. We believe it! All races and cultures have work to do. Be one of millions that strive for a world where OUR Human Family can LIVE the Oneness of Humankind, and are free from racial conditioning.

  • Snag
  • ecard
  • Bookmark and Share

Sharon E. Davis

Sharon is a founding member of the Institute for Healing of Racism in 1987. She has conducted International Dialogue Racism sessions in Mmabato, South Africa, and facilitated a Public Seminar on Cultural and Tribal Unity in Gabaronne, Botswana, and conflict resolution in China. She was interviewed by McNeil/Lehrer Newshour for the “Healing Racism in America” segment.

Sharon served as an International Institute and U.S Immigration Services speaker and MC at Swearing-in Ceremonies for new Americans, a regular TV panelist on “Interfaith Odyssey”, and Advisor and former Executive Director at the National Resource Center for Racial Healing which included being a Project Advisor – Diversity for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Saturn Titan Mission.

Whether Sharon is speaking to a boardroom full of executives or a group of seminar participants in South Africa, she applies her professional experiences and formal training to implement cultural change. Sharon has received numerous awards for her work in helping people unite including Spiritual Midwife of the Millennium Award for Cultural Diversity, one of six “Most Influential Black Women Entrepreneurs in Metro Detroit”, “Diversity Champion’s Honor Role” Birmingham Bloomfield Multiracial Community Council, the Houston, Texas Peace Award for Inter-group Understanding, and the TWIN award as one of 29 Outstanding Professional Women in Business and Industry. She has been quoted in several media publications.

  • Snag
  • ecard
  • Bookmark and Share

Advertisement